Low-frequency sound affects active micromechanics in the human inner ear

Conclusion

The results of this study clearly indicate that there is a pronounced discrepancy between the unobtrusive perception of LF sound, reflected in their low sensation levels and the physiological responses of the cochlea following the LF sound exposure. To the best of our knowledge, perception has been the only measure available in humans to assess inner ear responses to very LF sound, but, as the current data show, severely underestimates cochlear and, especially OHC, sensitivity. Direct quantifications of inner ear active amplification, as measured in this study, are much better suited to assess the risk potential of LF sound.

follow link to read full research paper. Low-frequency sound affects active micromechanics in the human inner ear

Related in the news:

Living close to wind farms could cause hearing damage

New research published by the Royal Society warns of the possible danger posed by low frequency noise like that emitted by wind turbines

Living close to wind farms may lead to severe hearing damage or even deafness, according to new research which warns of the possible danger posed by low frequency noise.

The physical composition of inner ear was “drastically” altered following exposure to low frequency noise, like that emitted by wind turbines, a study has found.

The research will delight critics of wind farms, who have long complained of their detrimental effects on the health of those who live nearby.

Published today by the Royal Society in their new journal Open Science, the research was carried out by a team of scientists from the University of Munich.

 

 

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