Category Archives: Cost Benefit

Tillsonburg Wind Turbine Blade Plant Closes

Workers locked out of a wind turbine blade plant in Tillsonburg Ontario were called to a community hall a few days later and given their dismissal notices.  The plant is shutting  down as not being economically viable.  The plant’s opening protested by those who oppose the harms of wind power installations and its closing came a very short 6 years later.  Hundred of workers in a small community now without work as wind industry jobs proved to be temporary.  The turbine blade plant in Windsor now placed on a watch list for a similar and predicted demise.  Ontario’s green energy economy an illusion that has been running on rate payer generated subsidies.

Kelly McParland: Another wheel flies off Ontario’s green energy bus, and lands on 340 workers

Despite overwhelming evidence that governments do badly when they try to remove the freedom from free enterprise, Wynne and McGuinty ploughed ahead with their green energy vision

When former premier Dalton McGuinty visited the new Siemens Canada plant in Tillsonburg in 2011, he brushed aside protesters and boasted that the plant was part of the Liberal alternative energy plan that would “put us at the forefront in North America.”

The plant made windmill blades. Windmills were the future. Clean energy was what McGuinty’s two-year-old Green Energy Act was all about. It would free the province of old, dirty manufacturing and introduce new, cutting-edge jobs that would make Ontario the envy of the world.

Just six years later the plant is closing. Management says big changes in the wind industry make it no longer viable. The cutting edge plant that was to help lead Ontario into the Valhalla of a clean energy future can’t survive in a market that wants bigger blades.

McGuinty has long since faded into retirement. He chose to step down rather than endure further questioning about an earlier energy fiasco. There was no sign of his successor, Kathleen Wynne, outside the factory, Tuesday, as newly-jobless workers sought an explanation for the closure. “There was quite a bit of anger in there because they shut the place down the other night and never really told anybody about it,” one complained to The London Free Press. “It was bang, everything was locked down.”

READ REST OF National Post ARTICLE

Multiple Wind Turbine Lawsuits Remain Up In The Air

By DERRICK PERKINS  Falmouth News

As Falmouth selectmen consider challenging a cease-and-desist order that left the community’s second wind turbine inoperable, they are taking into account all legal action surrounding the town-owned machines near Blacksmith Shop Road.

Since construction, Wind 1 and Wind 2 have drawn the ire of neighbors. Complaints include excess noise, harmful health effects, drops in property values and officials failing to follow proper rules as they allowed the projects to move forward.

A Barnstable County Superior Court judge’s decision agreeing with the zoning board of appeals in deeming Wind 2 a nuisance—and ordering it shut down—is the most recent development to garner headlines. Wind 1 powered down in 2015 after officials failed to earn a special permit from the town appeals board following another round of litigation brought on by abutters.

In a statement released after a lengthy June 26 executive session on the issue, selectmen asked all litigants to renew efforts to resolve the various legal actions involving the wind turbines outside of court.

The most pressing is the suit recently weighed in on by Judge Cornelius J. Moriarty II. Selectmen have until July 20 to decide whether to appeal, according to Town Counsel Frank K. Duffy Jr.

They likely will continue deliberating the issue in executive session—closed to the public—before their regularly scheduled meeting on Monday, July 10, Town Manager Julian M. Suso said. The next time selectmen are expected to meet is during a joint session with the planning board set for July 24—four days after the deadline.

Were selectmen to fight the ruling, the case would be heard in the Massachusetts Appeals Court.

A similar case is pending in Barnstable Superior Court. The town is appealing a decision by the zoning board of appeals to grant relief to neighbor Neil P. Andersen, who successfully argued the two turbines constituted a nuisance. A scheduling conference for that case is set for September, Mr. Duffy said.

A case pending in the Massachusetts Land Court revolves around the zoning board of appeals’ aforementioned decision to reject a special permit for operation of Wind 1. The town is appealing that ruling, and a trial assignment conference is scheduled for September, Mr. Duffy said.

Three common law cases also are pending in Barnstable Superior Court. Funfar v. Town of Falmouth, Ohkagawa v. Town of Falmouth and Elder et al v. Town of Falmouth all seek financial damages because of the nuisance caused by one or both of the turbines. None have been scheduled yet, Mr. Duffy said.

Decisions that went in town hall’s favor include one in a case arguing Wind 2 also needed a special permit to operate. A Barnstable Superior Court judge ruled in June that the effort had come too late in the process.

Still, Barry and Diane Funfar, the plaintiffs, could appeal, Mr. Duffy said.

In Laird v. Falmouth Zoning Board of Appeals, the plaintiff argued officials needed to apply regulations approved since the construction of the turbines on a request for a special permit to operate. The court sided with the appeals board.

In April, a Barnstable County Superior Court jury rejected a common law nuisance case brought forward by Mr. Andersen, who sought financial compensation for physical injury, lost property value and income.

Falmouth stands to lose a significant amount of money if litigation keeps the turbines powered down. Wind 1 largely was funded through a $5 million loan, which the town pays about $400,000 toward annually, whether or not it operates.

To erect Wind 2, the town sought a $4.85 million loan through the Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust. Although the loan initially offered interest-free by the trust, officials there have threatened to charge Falmouth principal and interest if the turbine ceases operating.

Additionally, the town has an agreement with the Mass Clean Energy Center, which helped defray some of the costs associated with Wind 1, to generate renewable energy over the course of several years.

falmouth wind turbines 3
Selectmen To Study Turbine Issue Further Before Appealing

Niagara Wind project road damage in West Lincoln could exceed 6 million

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Enercon wind turbine construction for Niagara Wind project

Wind company to cover costs of road damages in West Lincoln

Council in conflict over which roads to fix, pass decision over until October

NEWS Jun 27, 2017 by Alexandra Heck  Grimsby Lincoln News
WEST LINCOLN — The deal has yet to close, but town council is already in a quandary over how to spend funds they expect to receive from the Niagara Region Wind Farm for damage it caused to municipal roads during construction.

While it remains unclear what the final sum is that they expect to receive, on Monday night West Lincoln councillors considered roadwork that could total nearly $6.1M.

The recommendation from staff was to spend $5,274,702 on a number of roads in the southeast corner of West Lincoln, nearest to the site of the wind farm.

The recommendation also asked for $150,000 from the wind energy road restoration fund for staffing assistance as well as $585,000 to repair the bridge on South Chippawa Road.

The plans would span nearly 70 kilometres of roadway, over 20 different roads in the municipality.

On June 19, council met for a special meeting in camera to pass a resolution authorizing the agreement with the wind company. The result was that a bylaw be approved to execute a release and settlement with NR Capital General Partnership, the company related to the Niagara Region Wind Farm.

“We will not be releasing the final number based on our solicitor’s recommendation,” said Mayor Doug Joyner. “The Township of West Lincoln is not done negotiations with the wind company.”

Coun. Jason Trombetta says the negotiations are between the town’s solicitor and the wind company. He says that prior to his departure, chief administrative officer Chris Carter was in negotiations with the company alongside the solicitor; no council members were involved in the dealings, he says.

Trombetta put forward an amendment to the motion during the regular council session on Monday, asking for the work on the South Chippawa Road bridge to be removed and in its place, work on roads in his own ward.

“There’s a lot of exterior roads that were damaged by this project,” said Trombetta. “Why are other wards forgotten in all of this?”……

“This is a lot to dump on our plate here at one council meeting,” said Bylsma. “The hair on the back of my neck is getting raised.”

Couns. Joann Chechalk and Dave Bylsma said the decision was far too big to make that evening.

“We’re talking millions of dollars and we’re just doing it willy-nilly, on the fly,” said Bylsma. He stated that council should respect the science and engineering of the staff report and stick to their recommendations.

READ FULL ARTICLE @ Niagara This Week 

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Niagara Wind caused extensive road damage during construction. West Lincoln, ON

Power Should Have Stayed Local

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Hydro poles for high voltage transmission lines installed for Niagara Wind along rural roads

Dear Editor:
I wish to draw your attention to the statement  in Alexandra Heck’s article that the 77 turbine project, spanning properties in Lowbanks, Wainfleet, West Lincoln and Haldimand will power all the houses in Port Colborne, Wainfleet, Haldimand, Lincoln, West Lincoln and Grimsby.

The power from this project is being transported via that ugly transmission line to Grimsby Beach where it is carried to Hamilton and beyond.  We have been told that it is going to Oakville, where they have a need of the power because, as you will recall they lost their gas powered plants to the last election.

Seeing that all the wind power in Ontario, both up and running projects and those not yet on the grid,  will not  produce even  6% of all the power produced in Ontario,  it seems to me that shipping “all” this power to Oakville and beyond,  will not make much of a difference to the demand for power in the GTA.

Believe me,  the residents living along the transmission line wish that the power would have stayed in our communities since that would mean that there would be no huge  transmission lines,  no guard rails, no Road Use Agreement,  and ​at least 7,000 more trees along our road allowances.

Nellie DeHaan
Smithville ON

(Published in Niagara This Week on June 27th, 2017)

Cut trees anger property owners

Niagara Wind tree cut
Andy Koopal looks over the stump where an old growth oak tree once stood, beside his property in Wainfleet. Well over 7 000 trees many old growth, were cut in rural west Niagara for transmission lines to serve wind turbines.  PHOTO: Allan Benner/Welland Tribune/Postmedia Network

Niagara Wind Open House

On Thursday, June 15, 2017  Niagara Wind held an open house to celebrate the inauguration of its 77 industrial (3MW Enercon) wind turbine project located in West Lincoln, Haldimand and Niagara region.  The following is a write up from a member of the community who attended with her impressions and opinions.

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For sake of anonymity, I will use false names for anyone I speak of in this write up.

It should be noted that the true inauguration celebration happened at approximately 1pm and as noted in Niagara This Week, all the bigwigs in suits were bused in attendance for this champagne shindig.

“Representatives from Boralex, Enercon and the Six Nations of the Grand River Development Corporation all defended wind power and their new farm that straddles Haldimand County and the Niagara Region.”

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Michael Weidemann, executive vice president of ENERCON Canada standing outside of the company’s recent project in Lowbanks. The Niagara Region Wind Farm is a joint partnership with ENERCON, Boralex and Six Nations of the Grand River Development Corporation. – Alexandra Heck/ Metroland – Photo from Niagara This Week.

Here is a local write up from a local media company.

https://www.niagarathisweek.com/news-story/7375757-ceos-address-wind-concerns-at-farm-unveiling/

Here is my write up:

I arrived at the gates of hell, sorry, I mean gates to the property where the event was held on Bird Road, Lowbanks, Ontario shortly after 4pm.

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911 signage for multitude of wind turbines in bushes at the roadside

I stopped and talked to Linda from MAWTi for a quick moment before entering the property.  Her infant was napping in the stroller and I asked how the 1pm shindig went and we discussed a few things before I carried on.  Linda was holding a nice big sign, specific to the design of the Enercon Turbines that infest our rural routes and in many cases, our backyards and as always, she is fierce in her stance against the projects despite the extreme heat, humidity and sun.

So attendees to this event had to drive quite the distance through the agricultural farmed land to the designated parking area by the temporary white tents and out near the turbines.  I was greeted by ‘security’ before getting to the parking and tent area.  Really?  Security?  Is this necessary?  For some reason, the community attendees were required to purchase a ticket(s) online ($0).  Anyways, Mr. Security didn’t ask for my ticket, just told me where to park because ‘its about to get real busy.’
I said ‘Oh ya? Whys that?’
He replied with ‘I just think it’s going to get super busy, people want to come and see these turbines.’ I replied with a bit of a sarcastic tone ‘most of us get to see them every single day, like it or not’ and I put my window up drove to park.

There was one big white tent with tables set up inside, a bar that clearly had the champagne cleared out, but residents were privy to chilled water and pop.  Inside the tent situated at one end were the typical large displays with descriptive images of the internal mechanics of the project Enercon E-101 turbines, stats and facts and various pamphlets touting the good of the wind industry.  I pretended like I haven’t seen all this before and snapped a picture.  Internally I felt like a moron because anyone who is interested in Industrial Wind Turbines for any reason, knows about the guts so I passed on any further photo ops.June 2017 107

I took a pamphlet from CanWea titled, “The Secret Is Out, Wind Is In. Building a stronger, cleaner and affordable energy system.”  I grumbled under my breath, ‘Gawd, this shit is thick’ and an elderly man I hadn’t noticed beside me snickered and nodded his head. I winked and quickly scooted away before I felt obligated to engage in conversation.  canwea

The pamphlet, if it is to spout the reality of Renewables, should read, The Secret Is Out, Wind Is RAMMED In. Building the most unreliable, intermittent power grid, wiping out ecological systems far and wide, dividing communities, harming humans and creating wide spread energy poverty in Ontario.  That is what it should read.  The TRUTH.

So then I began my stroll to the other end of the tent.  This tent was huge!  Obviously there was a need for this large tent to house all the leaseholders, stakeholders and investors and surely it must be challenging to squeeze that much corruption into one tent.

Fred from Boralex noticed me and walked over and we said our courteous hellos.  We chatted for a brief few more minutes about this and that, but as usual I was eager to jumped into question mode.  There are some mechanics I don’t understand and want to understand better.

I asked ‘are the converters are under the ground?’
Fred replied no they are in the turbines themselves.
Me, not fully understanding how can a converter be INSIDE the turbine did my squinty face and I asked ‘so under the turbine?’
Fred said do you want to go in the turbine I can explain better.  Off we went to the turbine. Fred, Roger and myself.

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Enercon  E101 3 MW wind turbine- Niagara Wind Project

Before I got to the turbine I could hear this high pitch screaming.  I knew I was in for it with these triggered ears and head of mine, but in I went because curiosity always gets the better of me. It is so loud with this high pitched frequency that I cannot relate it to anything else I have ever experienced before.  It could be like tinnitus in 4D.  Anyways, in I went.  WOW!  Not going to lie, very impressive!  (Impressive minus the high pitched screaming that is).  We talked for a bit about what was inside and how it all works and fans etc. and guess what.  They have an elevator to get to the top.  Yup.  An elevator.

Don’t quote me on this, but if I understood correctly the high pitched screaming is because they convert from AC to DC then back from DC to AC.  It is the switching of something at a very rapid pace that makes the high pitched noise and does the converting inside the converters that really are inside the turbine.  So this converting back and forth, as I was told, was the most perfect energy (Hz I believe) wave that is created.  Picture a hand moving in a up and down in a perfect wave motion <– as per Fred with Boralex.

Up Close to Live Grid Input
This photo is of the computer board inside the Turbine.  It is ‘live’ so the numbers are changing accordingly.  Interesting to me is they tout the 3.0MW turbines, yet their measurement for live power is in kW.  The Electrical energy of 5125.397 MWh is from commencement with the Grid, Nov 2, 2016.  Operating hours is the same, since commencement with the Grid.

As we continued to converse with others joining in on the conversation, an eager graduate who proudly just graduated his 4 year program at Mohawk almost bounced over, blonde trendy hair flopping all over as he runs his hands through it, whips his clipboard out from under his arm, fully armed with his resume and credentials from school and boldly interrupted our conversation.  He wanted a job in the wind industry.  BADLY.  I took the opportunity to move on and Fred continued his conversation with this very eager new graduate.

I made my way back to the tent.  I wanted to see what was on the computer screens and to see if there was a presentation.  I asked the young lady there, very nice young lady, if there was a presentation put on later.  Nope.  No presentation, just a slide show of photos of during and after construction of the project.  Nothing worth sticking around for.

On my way back to my truck I noticed a GAS generator.  Ok, best photo OP of the day.  A gas generator used to run the computers for the slide show.  The irony was not lost on me.

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Best Photo Op of the Day: Gas Generator used to power the slide show of wind turbine facility .

When I was leaving I saw the eager graduate at his vehicle.  I stopped and asked him about his program at Mohawk.  I wanted to know if he was serious about Wind and what he knew.  He clearly is in over his head.  It was shocking to me that after 4 years he hadn’t a clue about the simplest thing,  such as The Grid app on a smartphone or a reasonable ‘educated’ response to any questions I asked him.  I asked why the wind industry and he said it fascinated him the most.  I slide into our conversation that you will not be a very liked person within the communities and could cause conflicts between friend and family.
He said ‘my dad and his friends have already yelled at me several times for it.’
I responded with ‘it isn’t the yelling that should concern you; it is WHY they are yelling.  What are they trying telling you? What aren’t you listening too?’
Then I told him Wind Industry will die one day.
He seriously thought I was crazy, I could tell, meanwhile I KNOW he is.  ALL the energy needs of the world?  Ok, buddy, refund in your education should be first on your list.

I asked ‘do you have a smart phone?’
‘Yes”
I asked ‘do you follow any of the grid apps?’ He actually responded with ‘what is that.’  If ever there was a time to smack my forehead in disbelief then would of been an appropriate time.
I asked ‘do you have Google?’
He said ‘yes, I use it.’
I responded with ‘Google wind turbines and do some homework before you settle into the wind industry.’

We talked for a few more minutes and it became more and more obvious to me, and apparent to him that he really didn’t know squat.  I suggested he talk to rural route residents on both sides of the fence.  Talk to people who are slammed with energy poverty.  He inquired on what energy poverty was.  Spending 4 years in a renewables program and no idea with energy poverty is.  Again I encouraged Google, the local news and worldwide news.  We discussed other renewable options ‘taught’ in his 4 year program such as hydro, geothermal and solar.  He (reluctantly) admitted the majority of his program focused on solar and wind, because Geothermal and Hydro weren’t our future.  Boy would I love to get my hands on that program.  He is a young kid, 24 yrs old tops and has no idea that there is a grid app and spent 4 years in the renewable energy program and to boot he PAID for that education.  I showed him my app and what was being contributed to the grid live.

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Snapshot of my grid app on my phone.  It was a pretty remarkable day with West Lincoln NRWF pumping it to the grid.  Good thing I didn’t depend on this 230MW, $1 Billion wind farm to use my toaster this particular day. (was not a current day photo)

He looked confused and said ‘OK, thanks for sharing that.’

I strongly urged him  ‘seriously do yourself a favor and do as most responsible adults would, research your desired field and look into wind and its many complex problems associated with it.’

He said with so much excitement and enthusiasm, ‘look at these,’ both hands held out, one with a water bottle in it and his blonde hair flopping around in the wind.  ‘They are huge and incredibly technical and generate so much energy to your home every day.’

I dropped the f-bomb and said tell your dad he has more yelling to do, I have to go.

I left the scene.  Yes, scene.  I feel like it wasn’t real and entirely staged.  There were maybe 2 dozen tops when I was there.  People brought their small children and there was a great mix of people of various ages.

Now, it is time for reflection.

Open house.  It is slightly interesting but predictable, that the entire community wasn’t invited to the inauguration.  There wasn’t even a great attempt at getting the word out that there was an open house with left over, sun exposed heated gooey cheese, bread and non-alcoholic beverages for the left over community.

If the people I communicate with almost daily didn’t share the info, I wouldn’t of been informed of this event.  Which also raises an eyebrow, as I am suppose to be on the list of event notifications with Niagara Region Wind Farm.

There wasn’t even a wee bit of an attempt to ooohhh and ahhhh us with a small guided presentation, touting the benefits of the wind farm, the project completion, what this means for the community, how many jobs they (didn’t) create and so forth.  No attempt to dazzle us, the left over community, with a show of any sort.  We don’t matter.  Clearly.

The designation of this champagne shindig was for those who profit financially.  Stakeholders.  Upper Management. Leaseholders.

Left out of the 1pm champagne inauguration is all the community members who are forced to live with these monstrous jolly green giants.  Our choices revoked, our voices silenced and in too many cases, family units shattered.  Our health can be adversely impacted, with families forced from their homes, permanently or to seek temporary relief.   All the rate payers for electricity who are forced to subsidize an embellished industry, were left out of this celebration that they felt was appropriate to have in our backyards.  All of us were left out of the celebrations.

This was not an accident.  This is a Wind Industry, excelling with the support of the Liberal government, decimating rural route Ontario on our dime.

My wounds are salted.

I have been working on this write up for a few days.  I was rattled by the photo below.  It literally stopped me in my tracks.  I stared at it and over the last few days, looked at it several times.  It took me some time to actually grasp and process this picture.  It became apparent that I needed to acknowledge there are people actually celebrating with champagne around the corner from our once treasured home, while my family and my personal life has been inverted.

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This is not my photo, this is from Niagara News This Week.

This picture right here.  This picture brought it full circle for me and flooded my soul with a wave of raw emotions.  These people are truly proud, celebrating the very same project that has devastated lives.  Destroyed lives.  Causing harm to family members and collapsing family units.  Is causing physical harm to people. Is causing harm to the environment.  Is forcing families from their homes.  This project, this celebration, is also a contributor to the highest rates of electricity in North America.  Energy poverty is forefront.  A top news chart.  These projects are costing ratepayers BILLIONS of extra money.

All of these champagne celebrating guests have hijacked my family of our rights to prosper, to enjoy our home and property, our right to health and protection and have subscribed to the removal of our rights, both under the Charter and in the Constitutional Act.  This is no small feat.  This is no small crime.  This is a methodical conquering of the removal of many rights for everyone.  You are not exempt from this wind industry corruption because you have your champagne glass in hand.  You just haven’t felt the true wrath of your ill informed decisions.  Yet here we have my neighbors celebrating with a corrupt industry, champagne filled glasses held high, in honor of all the mayhem forced into many people’s lives.

The ill placement of Industrial Wind Turbines has stolen our future.

Excuse me while I fill a glass with champagne to celebrate.

**Some photos compliments of Niagara News This Week

Source: Sandy Journalized

Nothing Brings a Community Together Like Wind Energy

To The Editor:

Not many things bring together a community like an Industrial Wind Energy Installation. In Illinois, the Concerned Citizens for the Future of Clinton and DeKalb Counties have banned together to fight Industrial Wind. Their lawyers took NextEra and the wind industry’s parade of “experts” to task in sworn testimony.

In Michigan’s Thumb, their “Wind Capital” has their own group of citizens calling themselves the Interstate Informed Citizen’s Coalition who helped to discover that townships could call for a referendum vote on whether or not they wanted any more wind energy. 12 townships, 12 votes, 12 times the answer was a resounding NO.

Vermont is working on enacting a much stricter IWT noise ordinance as well as setbacks 10x the height of the turbine. Minnesota has a similar bill in the works.

Oklahoma ended its wind subsidies early because of the overwhelming cost of Industrial Wind. Their former Governor Frank Keating released a statement saying that he regrets his part in funding Industrial Wind.

There are over 300 groups that have been formed for the singular reason of opposing Industrial Wind in North America alone. Europe and Australia have many groups of their own. They are people who may have thought that Industrial Wind was good or at least benign until they educated themselves, or where educated by their close proximity to turbines. There is well over a decade of testimonials, documentation, expert witness accounts and research into the negative impacts of Industrial Wind. The wind industry also has come up with its own testimonials, documentation, expert witness accounts and research that seeks to reframe or refute all the opposition’s evidence just as tobacco companies have done. Why are these negative impacts still listed within their contracts if there are not major problems?

People like to say that landowners can do whatever they want to on their own land but you know that is not true. If what you are doing (or not doing) negatively impacts your neighbor whether it be the length of your grass or the number of vehicles in your yard, it is not allowed. In our townships where the wind development is being proposed only a few people were willing to sign over land where they actually live. 4-5 people alone were responsible for signing over of the land for the proposed installation. That leaves 100s of people directly impacted but left with no choice to opt out.

Lastly people equate turbines with CAFOs. If they are allowed to annoy neighbors then Industrial Wind should get the same right is how the thinking goes. Our Planning and Zoning Board asked for mile setbacks for IWT, same as CAFOs but the wind companies said that they would leave. Our Supervisors shortened the setback to bring in revenue. Their first consideration needed to be people impacted, not the money to be made. Though industry supported with tax money is like cutting off the top foot of a blanket and sewing to the bottom to make it longer.

(signed) Janna Swanson

Coalition for Rural Property Rights

Ayrshire, IA

Published June 15, 2017 Emmetsburg News

ridgesrenotrenewble

Big Green and Mean

next era bullies

Big ‘Green’ and Mean: A Wind-Energy Giant Attacks Small-Town America

by ROBERT BRYCE May 2, 2017 4:00 AM @PWRHUNGRY

The world’s biggest wind-turbine company has filed lawsuits against five rural governments because they stand between it and millions in tax subsidies.

NextEra Energy, which bills itself on its website as “the world’s largest generator of renewable energy,” is suing a tiny municipality in one of Oklahoma’s poorest counties. In mid February, NextEra, which operates 110 wind projects in 20 states, filed lawsuits in both state and federal court against the town of Hinton, population: 3,200. Why is the wind giant suing the Caddo County town? Simple: Hinton stands between NextEra and nearly $18 million per year in federal tax subsidies. NextEra isn’t suing only Hinton. Since last October, the wind giant has filed lawsuits against five rural governments from Oklahoma to Michigan, all of which have imposed limits on wind-turbine development.

The company has also filed a libel suit against Esther Wrightman, a Canadian activist who opposed a project NextEra wanted to build in Kerwood, Ontario. Wrightman’s offense? She called the company “NexTerror” and “NextError” on her website, ontario-wind-resistance.org. That libel suit, filed four years ago, is still pending.

To be certain, the oil and gas industry has filed lawsuits against local governments that have sought limits on hydraulic fracturing. The difference is that NextEra is using taxpayers’ money to fund its courthouse mugging of small-town America. Between 2008 and 2015, according to a recent report by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, NextEra accumulated profits of $21.5 billion but didn’t pay a dime in federal income taxes. Over that time frame, only ten other American companies received more in tax subsidies than NextEra. Nor does it appear that NextEra will be paying federal taxes any time soon. In its 10-K filing for 2016 with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the company reported $3 billion in tax-credit carryforwards that it can use to directly offset tax liabilities in future years. Remember, tax credits are more valuable than a deduction from revenue or accelerated depreciation. As my accounting consultant (and brother) Wally Bryce, a CPA, reminds me: “You’d much rather get a tax credit because it applies dollar for dollar against what you owe the government.”

NextEra wants more tax credits. And it’s litigating to get more. But each lawsuit NextEra files against a yet-smaller rural town or yet-smaller website owner provides another example of the backlash against Big Wind and, even more appalling, how Big Wind is using the issue of climate change as an excuse to make a run on the Treasury. Since 2015, more than 130 government entities in states from Maine to California have moved to reject or restrict the encroachment of the wind industry. And while other wind companies have also sued small towns, none can match NextEra’s scorched-earth tactics……

Read more at National Review 

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Esther Wrightman holding notice of lawsuit filed against her by NextEra

SLAPP Lawsuit Filed by NextEra Against Esther Wrightman

Statement of Defense filed by Esther Wrightman

Chatham-Kent Should Stay out of Investment Biz

Letter to Editor:

Sir: Chatham-Kent municipal Corporation continues to make taxpayer funded investments that continue to end in taxpayer liability, when continually given evidence not to.

Municipalities should not be in the investment business. They are hired by taxpayers to prudently manage to create dividends, not to mismanage to create liability. The Bradley Centre, with hundreds of thousands of dollars in net annual losses; the Industrial Park, which accumulated a $20 million total to date loss; the Capital Theatre, having a total provincial and municipal gross loss of about many millions, not the skimpy losses generally reported; Kingston Park with a $2 million overrun in costs; taxpayer funded annual municipal wage and pension payout of about $138M, with only about $146 million in general annual revenues.

If I understood the recent clouded, scattered and incomplete municipal budget correctly, C-K has nearly $40 million in interest payments on such capital projects. Canada-wide, taxpayers are paying about $62 billion and $11 billion annually just to service the debt of Canada and Ontario respectively. All of day-to-day cash of government operations come from the private sector, you and I, but yet, governments continue to financially rape their only source of income by introducing about 120 taxes on everything we do, on every nickel we earn, and continue to make irresponsible and fool hardy investments that never comes out of their pocket book, only ours.

The Provincial Green Energy Act, paving the way for wind turbines, created a 70-per-cent hike in electricity costs, costs consumers an extra $37 billion, and under the Auditors report will cost us an additional $133 billion by 2032.

The auditor’s report confirms for each wind energy job created, three Ontario jobs are lost. The mayor supports wind turbines, and his short sighted thinking makes Chatham-Kent nickels and dimes, while the province is losing billions, whereby billions have to be made up by taxing us more to make up the losses.

Recently, C-K council approved an $8-million investment in wind turbines, cited by the mayor to give us an $11-million profit after 20 years, which will keep taxes down. This thinking is worse than a migraine and mirrors how the province manages tax dollars. More specific to the wind turbine investment. C-K will become “common” shareholders in 15 per cent of a foreign company, meaning if the company dissolves or liquidates or reconstructs itself we as “common” shareholders lose all to preferred stock holders, bond holders, creditors, etc., not to mention if no profits are realized due to provincial or legal intervention. $8 million from reserves invested with compounding interest could give us up to $15M after 20 years without risk. Taking money from reserves means we have to replenish it, either by cashing in bonds, creating higher taxes, reducing infrastructure investment or by other means.

We have reserves for good reason.

If any dividends were realized from the turbine investment taxpayers won’t see a dime nor will any reduction in taxes be apparent. C-K will create a separate corporation, under the Business Corporations Act, RSO- 1990 for this manoeuvre, transferring same to Entegrus, which disallows taxpayers, although it’s all your money, to not know what’s going on, unless Entegrus/Corix wishes you to.

Additionally, Entegrus is courting to grab up to $30 million more from Chatham-Kent taxpayers for future investments with private companies.

Companies like Entegrus are more inclined to use investment income as an indirect way to feed their own wages, pensions, travel, perks and allowances, office upgrades, company vehicles etc., before any benefit is given to the taxpayer.

Furthermore, having Chatham-Kent a wind turbine investor, how the hell can council and our municipality speak against the turbine company respecting any legal action, public safety liability or other?

John Cryderman

Chatham

Published April 24, 2017 The Chatham Voice

randy hope
Mayor Randy Hope of Chatham Kent- Wind Industry award recipient continues to actively promote industrial wind turbines 

What’s the plan Premier?

connecting GEA

“…neither the environment nor the economy is served by aggressive environmental policies that prove to be economically unsustainable. The energy transition requires good planning and sustained momentum.

But the province has yet to revise its policies to reflect this lesson. For instance, it has not repealed the Green Energy Act which set overly expensive rates and led to overly generous long-term electricity contracts. It has suspended, but not cancelled, the second round of its Large Renewable Energy Procurement (LRP II) process, despite forecasts showing that this additional electricity supply will not be needed.”

To build a cost-effective, low carbon, reliable and resilient electricity system, Ontario must learn from its mistakes and face its challenges and risks.

Written By: John Haffner, Mark Cameron, Jim Burpee
April 20, 2017  

READ ARTICLE: http://policyoptions.irpp.org/magazines/april-2017/ontario-still-needs-an-electricity-policy-plan/

Cameron-fig1_en

 

Motion to Halt Industrial Wind Turbines- Queen’s Park

sam oosterhoff- queens park
Motion tabled at Queen’s Park to halt industrial wind turbines by MPP Oosterhoff

(Queen’s Park)  April 6, 2017

Niagara West-Glanbrook MPP Sam Oosterhoff :
“The Liberal government forced turbines on municipalities across rural Ontario against the wishes and concerns of residents and communities such as West Lincoln,” said Oosterhoff. “This stubborn initiative of the Liberals shows no respect for municipalities or for the ordinary concerns of Ontarians.”
“Industrial wind turbines are one of the causes of our sky-rocketing energy costs because of the unaffordable contracts made by the Liberals,” noted Oosterhoff. “Heat or eat is not a decision people should have to make.”
“The Liberals have a long history of ignoring municipalities and local residents. The NDP pretend to support local decision-making, but instead they supported the legislation that left municipalities without a voice on the placement of industrial turbines,” said Oosterhoff. “Tomorrow, they will have a chance to make amends and show respect for our communities by voting for my Motion.”
Motion:
“That in the opinion of this House, the Government should place a moratorium on the installation of industrial wind turbines in unwilling host communities in the Province of Ontario.”
Debate on the Motion:   
Media Articles:
Recorded vote:
vote of IWT motion