Category Archives: Cost Benefit

To the very end

To the very end…

“It will be expensive. And it’ll be expensive when I win my suit in Ottawa because that will make all of the IWT’s illegal, they’ll all have to come down, and somebody’s going to have to pay the bill.”
– Alan Whiteley re: Ontario’s “Fair Hydro Plan”

Alan Whiteley presentation to the committee on Ontario’s Fair Hydro Plan  links the government’s  response to escalating electricity rates and harsh decisions people are forced to make in the face of energy poverty.  Ontario is taken to task over to its failure to assess costs ,benefits and adverse consequences of its renewable energy policies.

 

heat or eatAlan Whiteley is the legal lead for the Judicial Review before the Courts of Ontario’s Green Energy Act (GEA).  The challenge is predicted to be successful and would result in making all erected Industrial Wind Turbines in Ontario illegal resulting in a very expensive bill to be paid as remedy.

For more information about CCSAGE Naturally Green’s Judicial Review of the GEA.

The following media report has an edited written version of Mr.Whiteley’s presentation to the Ontario Fair Hydro Act 2017 committee in June 2017:

Ontario’ Fair Hydro Act a Ponzi Scheme

amherst NS

 

 

Ontario Government Understates Annual Deficit and Net Debt: Auditor General

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Wind turbines marring rural landscape in Ontario

“The legislature and all Ontarians must be able to rely on the Province’s consolidated financial statements to fairly report the fiscal results for the year. This year they cannot do so”
-Auditor General of Ontario

What have been the costs of Ontario’s energy policies?  The Auditor General of Ontario highlights issues in the Government’s fiscal reports in its  recent news release. 

Impacts of energy policy decisions can be found within the example of ongoing discord over the build out of renewable energy projects such as wind facilities. The Government continues to face criticism over its failure to undertake cost and benefit analyses. Economic stress is being realized and demonstrated by the rapid and dramatic rises in electricity rates and the threat of even more bill spikes predicted.  Higher electrical bills remain the trend despite Government’s reduction measures recently introduced.

“Lysyk also warned that the accounting design the Government created for the electricity bill reduction under the Ontario Fair Hydro Plan Act, 2017 may lead to a larger understated deficit and net debt next year. A Special Report on this subject will be tabled in the fall. “

Energy poverty and economic impoverishment are personal threats to individuals, families and communities who are struggling to get by.  Politicians massage numbers to fit desired images they want to create and sell but at the end of the day it results in selling out the people they were elected to serve.

Independent Auditor’s Qualified Opinion

End of Champagne Celebrations for wind industry in Ontario?

niagara wind open house champagne cheer
Wind Works Power Ontario Update – 48MW reach COD, end of Ontario Operations

(via TheNewswire)

SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES / TheNewswire / August 23rd, 2017 Wind Works Power Corp. (OTC:WWPW -News) is pleased to announce that it has completed its Ontario projects consisting of 24xSenvion 2MW MM100 turbines. Wind Works had developed the projects in Ontario and applied for and received the FIT contracts from the Ontario Power Authority in 2010. Wind Works joined forces with Capstone Infrastructure in a joint venture, which eventually acquired the remainder of the projects after commercial operation was achieved. The projects total 48MW and include the Wind Works projects Ganaraska, Grey Highland ZEP, Settlers Landing, and Snowy Ridge, all of which have achieved commercial operation.

Wind Works has agreed with the government of Ontario to terminate the FIT contract applied for in 2009 and awarded in 2010 to the Cloudy Ridge project. The project received its REA permit from the Government of Ontario in December 2015. Wind Works had furthermore increased the interconnection deposit by approx. CAD $5.5M in December 2015 after HONI had previously changed the POI and PCC of the project due to other projects dropping out. Wind Works had also made down payments for 5 wind turbines from Senvion which have been manufactured and were awaiting onsite transport. Despite the late stage development process, given repeated governmental uncertainties, Wind Works was forced to terminate the FIT contract.

Given that the government of Ontario recently cancelled the previously repeatedly announced second bidding process for up to 850 MW renewable energy, and given the loss incurred by Cloudy Ridge due to repeated governmental uncertainties, Wind Works has decided to terminate any activities in the uncertain and unpredictable Ontario renewable energy market. Consequently, WW has cancelled its previous plans to invest a further $300 Million in Ontario and to focus instead on the US market.

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Oops it has happened again!

Wainfleet has a turbine missing its blade or what the wind industry likes to call “a rare event” or in fanciful terms, a component liberation.

Turbine 5 haunts the horizon in the  Wainfleet Wind Energy project.  The installation  is comprised of 5 Vestas V100-1.8 MW which have a hub height of 95m and a rotor diameter of 100m.   This smaller project began commercial operation in 2014 and  is one of many wind projects for the rural area of southern Ontario. Only three years old and a broken blade already needing to be removed.   Nothing new to see here, just a whole lot of useless mess to get rid of.

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Wainfleet Wind Energy turbine 5 missing a blade, 3 years after being erected. Ontario, August 2017

Public need all the facts on well water

Aug 14 • Letters to the Editor •
Sir: Mayor Hope, you and Chatham-Kent council are playing a game. A very dangerous game that is affecting the life style as well as the very livelihood of some of your constituents.

Mayor Hope, you and most of your councillors do not know what is going on within Chatham-Kent, especially in regard to the wind farm sites in the former Dover and Chatham townships. This is proven by the fact that most of you have never visited any of the reported problem sites to see firsthand what the affected families are experiencing. You are making decisions based on what you hear from the wind companies, their associates and the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change – all of whom have biased opinions based on profits or their lack of willingness to admit that they made errors.

In addition, you as mayor and council, who have invested $8 million of the Chatham-Kent taxpayers’ reserve fund, are in conflict of interest with regards to any decision made on wind farms or any conflicts arising form them.

You, Mayor Hope, indicated that, “the group (WWF) had a chance to meet with the MOECC ‘and they turned it into a circus.’” You were not there!

Do you recall that the MOECC, having been given a list of questions over one month before the meeting and not answering one of them being a circus? Do you consider the MOECC not giving WWF a promised copy of the minutes of the meeting that they promised part of the circus? Would those minutes have exposed their incompetence?

You indicate that you do not release all of your correspondence to the public. Perhaps you should. How many things are you hiding? Did you ever think that in the letter, received by Freedom of Information, that Mr. Murray’s reply might have been important information? In Mr. Murray’s reply letter it states, “The measurement of turbidity is a key test of water quality because it captures the potential impact that a vibration from a wind turbine could have on a water well. The ministry is aware that some residents are concerned that wind turbine vibration may shake sediment loose in a water well. These particles could have a chemical make-up of heavy metals that are naturally occurring in the area; however any existing heavy metals in the rock particles do not dissolve with vibration. Should a wind turbine vibration cause elevated turbidity in a water well, the wind farm company would be required to implement a contingency plan that is to include, as a minimum, remedial measures to be undertaken by the company, at the company’s expense, to resolve any impacts to wells or well water resulting from the construction, operation, or decommissioning of the facility.”

Mayor Hope, don’t you want your constituents to know that there can be heavy metals in their well water?

All of the affected wells in Dover were once clear water producers and now carry particles that the MOECC refuses to analyze for chemical content. Particles of 30 to 40 microns in size or larger can be seen by the human eye. Particle smaller than that cannot be seen.

In tests done to date by well owners in Dover Township, it indicates that almost half of the particles carried in the water are less than one micron in size. These particles can penetrate skin and walls of body organs. Approximately another 25 per cent of the particles are less than two microns in size.

These particles may carry the heavy metals, to which former Minister Murray refers, such as uranium, arsenic and lead. This is why, Mayor Hope, you should have released Minister Murray’s letter to the public, so the public could have been made aware.

According to the MOECC turbidity measurement, on which the MOECC hangs its hat, this water should be safe to consume. Why do they not take a total analysis and find out what is dissolved in the water and what are the particles carried by the water and if it is safe to drink.

I strongly suggest that the mayor and all of council visit one of the affected sites. If you find it too humbling to visit with one of your constituents, then go without using any of your water for drinking or cooking and think about what effect contaminated water could have on you when you bathe or wash your clothes. Perhaps all other people who are not sure of the effect of not having potable water should also try this for a period of time.

Water wells have gone for decades producing clean, clear water. Common sense would indicate that after the wind farms drove piles in Dover Township and ruined wells there, we would stop building wind farms. We now have piles being driven in Chatham Township and wells are now being ruined there as well. Obviously, there is a direct correlation between pile driving and a negative effect on water wells.

When will those with some authority ever wake up?

Is the solution bigger turbines in the Otter Creek Wind Farm? What would you expect to happen there?

Water security, Mayor Hope, is not a circus or a game. At the Windsor meeting with the MOECC, which you did not attend, it was the citizens of Chatham-Kent that were trying to protect the water security of the municipality, not you.

Mayor Hope, in the future when you receive information about public health, share the information with the public.

Peter J Hensel

Dover Centre

Published: The Chatham Voice.com

randy hope

A New Enemy To Unite Us

The common enemy of humanity is man.
In searching for a new enemy to unite us, we came up
with the idea that pollution, the threat of global warming,
water shortages, famine and the like would fit the bill. All these
dangers are caused by human intervention, and it is only through
changed attitudes and behaviour that they can be overcome.
The real enemy then, is humanity itself
.
– Club of Rome; The First Global Revolution (page75)–

 

 

West Lincoln accepts payout for damage to roads by Niagara Wind

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Enercon wind turbines of Niagara Wind project towering over trees in Lowbanks, Ontario

WEST LINCOLN — Residents on Elcho Road did not want to go another winter with their road this way.

What was once a paved roadway has been stripped back to gravel after heavy trucks and machinery pummelled the pavement in the building of the Niagara Region Wind Farm.

“It’s brutal living on the road right now,” said Paul Reece, who has lived there for over 20 years. “We need it fixed, ASAP.”

A number of residents came out to council on Monday night to urge those around the horseshoe to fix the road.

Jim Greenwood is a farmer, and he says the dust is so bad when he drives his tractor down the road that he has to stop when he’s around children, because he simply can’t see them.

“When it’s dry, the dust is so bad,” he said, adding what used to be an annual hosing down of his front porch is now almost a weekly occurrence.

“It’s just costing me more money, and it’s unsafe.”

Kathryn Swain says she can’t even hang her laundry on the line to dry because of the dust.

“We had an accident that took out our hay wagon,” she said, because a vehicle slid out on the rocks.

Council took these anecdotes to heart when they voted to reconsider the decision to pass the nearly $6-million roadwork plans that they delayed last meeting.

After a lengthy debate last meeting over whether to amend the motion to fix the roads damaged by the construction of the wind farm, council chose to defer the choice until October.

“The original staff report was a fine report,” said Coun. Dave Bylsma. It was Jason Trombetta’s amendment to move some of the funding to fix roads in his ward that caused tension in the chamber.

This time around, Trombetta brought forward a solution that all of the councillors were content with.

“We came together to try to work something out for all the communities affected by turbines,” said Trombetta.

His amendment takes funding from the town’s capital budget that was slated to fix the roads already being serviced by the wind farm payout, and covers work in Ward 1.

“You’re not going to do the road twice,” said Coun. Mike Rehner. “What we’ve basically got right now is a duplication.”

Council voted unanimously in favour of the motion and the amendment.

Road resurfacing, like on Elcho road, will be prioritized.

Article by Alexandra Heck

Published July 25, 2017: Niagara This Week

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Rural roads damaged with construction of Niagara Wind project

Tillsonburg Wind Turbine Blade Plant Closes

Workers locked out of a wind turbine blade plant in Tillsonburg Ontario were called to a community hall a few days later and given their dismissal notices.  The plant is shutting  down as not being economically viable.  The plant’s opening protested by those who oppose the harms of wind power installations and its closing came a very short 6 years later.  Hundred of workers in a small community now without work as wind industry jobs proved to be temporary.  The turbine blade plant in Windsor now placed on a watch list for a similar and predicted demise.  Ontario’s green energy economy an illusion that has been running on rate payer generated subsidies.

Kelly McParland: Another wheel flies off Ontario’s green energy bus, and lands on 340 workers

Despite overwhelming evidence that governments do badly when they try to remove the freedom from free enterprise, Wynne and McGuinty ploughed ahead with their green energy vision

When former premier Dalton McGuinty visited the new Siemens Canada plant in Tillsonburg in 2011, he brushed aside protesters and boasted that the plant was part of the Liberal alternative energy plan that would “put us at the forefront in North America.”

The plant made windmill blades. Windmills were the future. Clean energy was what McGuinty’s two-year-old Green Energy Act was all about. It would free the province of old, dirty manufacturing and introduce new, cutting-edge jobs that would make Ontario the envy of the world.

Just six years later the plant is closing. Management says big changes in the wind industry make it no longer viable. The cutting edge plant that was to help lead Ontario into the Valhalla of a clean energy future can’t survive in a market that wants bigger blades.

McGuinty has long since faded into retirement. He chose to step down rather than endure further questioning about an earlier energy fiasco. There was no sign of his successor, Kathleen Wynne, outside the factory, Tuesday, as newly-jobless workers sought an explanation for the closure. “There was quite a bit of anger in there because they shut the place down the other night and never really told anybody about it,” one complained to The London Free Press. “It was bang, everything was locked down.”

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Multiple Wind Turbine Lawsuits Remain Up In The Air

By DERRICK PERKINS  Falmouth News

As Falmouth selectmen consider challenging a cease-and-desist order that left the community’s second wind turbine inoperable, they are taking into account all legal action surrounding the town-owned machines near Blacksmith Shop Road.

Since construction, Wind 1 and Wind 2 have drawn the ire of neighbors. Complaints include excess noise, harmful health effects, drops in property values and officials failing to follow proper rules as they allowed the projects to move forward.

A Barnstable County Superior Court judge’s decision agreeing with the zoning board of appeals in deeming Wind 2 a nuisance—and ordering it shut down—is the most recent development to garner headlines. Wind 1 powered down in 2015 after officials failed to earn a special permit from the town appeals board following another round of litigation brought on by abutters.

In a statement released after a lengthy June 26 executive session on the issue, selectmen asked all litigants to renew efforts to resolve the various legal actions involving the wind turbines outside of court.

The most pressing is the suit recently weighed in on by Judge Cornelius J. Moriarty II. Selectmen have until July 20 to decide whether to appeal, according to Town Counsel Frank K. Duffy Jr.

They likely will continue deliberating the issue in executive session—closed to the public—before their regularly scheduled meeting on Monday, July 10, Town Manager Julian M. Suso said. The next time selectmen are expected to meet is during a joint session with the planning board set for July 24—four days after the deadline.

Were selectmen to fight the ruling, the case would be heard in the Massachusetts Appeals Court.

A similar case is pending in Barnstable Superior Court. The town is appealing a decision by the zoning board of appeals to grant relief to neighbor Neil P. Andersen, who successfully argued the two turbines constituted a nuisance. A scheduling conference for that case is set for September, Mr. Duffy said.

A case pending in the Massachusetts Land Court revolves around the zoning board of appeals’ aforementioned decision to reject a special permit for operation of Wind 1. The town is appealing that ruling, and a trial assignment conference is scheduled for September, Mr. Duffy said.

Three common law cases also are pending in Barnstable Superior Court. Funfar v. Town of Falmouth, Ohkagawa v. Town of Falmouth and Elder et al v. Town of Falmouth all seek financial damages because of the nuisance caused by one or both of the turbines. None have been scheduled yet, Mr. Duffy said.

Decisions that went in town hall’s favor include one in a case arguing Wind 2 also needed a special permit to operate. A Barnstable Superior Court judge ruled in June that the effort had come too late in the process.

Still, Barry and Diane Funfar, the plaintiffs, could appeal, Mr. Duffy said.

In Laird v. Falmouth Zoning Board of Appeals, the plaintiff argued officials needed to apply regulations approved since the construction of the turbines on a request for a special permit to operate. The court sided with the appeals board.

In April, a Barnstable County Superior Court jury rejected a common law nuisance case brought forward by Mr. Andersen, who sought financial compensation for physical injury, lost property value and income.

Falmouth stands to lose a significant amount of money if litigation keeps the turbines powered down. Wind 1 largely was funded through a $5 million loan, which the town pays about $400,000 toward annually, whether or not it operates.

To erect Wind 2, the town sought a $4.85 million loan through the Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust. Although the loan initially offered interest-free by the trust, officials there have threatened to charge Falmouth principal and interest if the turbine ceases operating.

Additionally, the town has an agreement with the Mass Clean Energy Center, which helped defray some of the costs associated with Wind 1, to generate renewable energy over the course of several years.

falmouth wind turbines 3
Selectmen To Study Turbine Issue Further Before Appealing

Niagara Wind project road damage in West Lincoln could exceed 6 million

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Enercon wind turbine construction for Niagara Wind project

Wind company to cover costs of road damages in West Lincoln

Council in conflict over which roads to fix, pass decision over until October

NEWS Jun 27, 2017 by Alexandra Heck  Grimsby Lincoln News
WEST LINCOLN — The deal has yet to close, but town council is already in a quandary over how to spend funds they expect to receive from the Niagara Region Wind Farm for damage it caused to municipal roads during construction.

While it remains unclear what the final sum is that they expect to receive, on Monday night West Lincoln councillors considered roadwork that could total nearly $6.1M.

The recommendation from staff was to spend $5,274,702 on a number of roads in the southeast corner of West Lincoln, nearest to the site of the wind farm.

The recommendation also asked for $150,000 from the wind energy road restoration fund for staffing assistance as well as $585,000 to repair the bridge on South Chippawa Road.

The plans would span nearly 70 kilometres of roadway, over 20 different roads in the municipality.

On June 19, council met for a special meeting in camera to pass a resolution authorizing the agreement with the wind company. The result was that a bylaw be approved to execute a release and settlement with NR Capital General Partnership, the company related to the Niagara Region Wind Farm.

“We will not be releasing the final number based on our solicitor’s recommendation,” said Mayor Doug Joyner. “The Township of West Lincoln is not done negotiations with the wind company.”

Coun. Jason Trombetta says the negotiations are between the town’s solicitor and the wind company. He says that prior to his departure, chief administrative officer Chris Carter was in negotiations with the company alongside the solicitor; no council members were involved in the dealings, he says.

Trombetta put forward an amendment to the motion during the regular council session on Monday, asking for the work on the South Chippawa Road bridge to be removed and in its place, work on roads in his own ward.

“There’s a lot of exterior roads that were damaged by this project,” said Trombetta. “Why are other wards forgotten in all of this?”……

“This is a lot to dump on our plate here at one council meeting,” said Bylsma. “The hair on the back of my neck is getting raised.”

Couns. Joann Chechalk and Dave Bylsma said the decision was far too big to make that evening.

“We’re talking millions of dollars and we’re just doing it willy-nilly, on the fly,” said Bylsma. He stated that council should respect the science and engineering of the staff report and stick to their recommendations.

READ FULL ARTICLE @ Niagara This Week 

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Niagara Wind caused extensive road damage during construction. West Lincoln, ON