Category Archives: Destruction from turbines

Please Support Christine~ Court Challenge to Protect Ontario

water black shale

“When the pile driving and construction of the wind turbines started on our shallow aquifer our drinking water slowly turned black and is now unsafe to consume, cook with or even bathe in,” she says in court documents. “This issue continues today and we are not the only family affected by this devastation.”

SUPPORT Christine Burke in her legal challenge to protect Ontario and our well water

“Burke alleges that the minister, government officials, and the companies violated the law for failing to take “reasonable care” to prevent the contamination (of home’s well water) as the wind farms were installed.”

Many Ontario people want their well water protected from the impacts of industrial wind turbines.  It is well known that the present MECP guidelines are grossly inadequate and do NOT require sediment or micro particle size and composition testing.

Christine Burke has taken a necessary step to challenge the Ontario Government, Ministry employees and the Wind companies.

We encourage ALL Ontario residents to come and support Christine,

Wednesday August 14, 2019 at  9:00am for an outside presence, with court starting @ 10:00am.

Address: Blenheim court house, 21633 Communications Rd, RR#5, Blenheim,
519 352-8484

We must be conscious that the time and date could change and we will do our best to keep you notified.

Come and show your support for this very brave, courageous woman.
Carpooling is encouraged

Concerns raised about Nation Rise Wind Farm construction

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Photo provided by Laurie Harkin-Chiasson shows the dust cloud created as Portland Cement Type 10 is being loaded from one vehicle onto another for construction of access roads for the Nation Rise Wind Farm on July 11, 2019.

Sarnia The Observer|Nick Dunne|July 23, 2019

CRYSLER — A North Stormont woman is concerned about potentially harmful dust clouds blown onto her property and those around her as access roads are being built for the Nation Rise Wind Farm.

Laurie Harkin-Chiasson was shocked to learn the dust billowing from the construction contained Portland 10 cement powder, which can cause skin and respiratory irritation and serious eye damage. Harkin-Chiasson said she and her neighbours weren’t notified of the construction on July 11, when she warned her neighbour who was walking with her infant in a stroller as the clouds came through, nor were they notified on July 15 when construction resumed nearby her home.

“I’ve taken it upon myself to stand up for my community,” she said.

The clouds came from a soil-stabilization procedure being done to build the access roads to the 29 wind turbines. The procedure involves removing the topsoil and blending the soil below with cement, before covering the surface gravel to secure the floor for paving.

“I could feel it in the back of my throat,” said Harkin-Chiasson.

The safety data sheet (SDS) from Lafarge, a cement and concrete company, said long- and short-term exposure to the dust of Portland 10 cement can cause severe skin burns, eye damage and may cause respiratory irritation. It may also cause acute silicosis, which “results from short-term exposure to very large amounts of respirable crystalline silica,” according to the SDS sheet.

Harkin-Chiasson has taken the matter to EDP Renewables, the company that owns the wind farm, along with North Stormont council, the Ontario Ministry of the Environment, and the Ministry of Labour.

According to Harkin-Chiasson, it took two calls to the ministry before the EDP began sending notices.

She was particularly angered when she was told through the ministry the company had offered to wash the cars of those affected by the dust.

“Our community’s health and safety is at risk. I was so insulted,” Harkin-Chiasson said.

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Health Hazard Investigation of impacted Water Wells

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Well water in Chatham Kent  has been reported contaminated with black shale sediment during construction and operations of the North Kent Wind* project.  Ontario’s current government made an election promise to investigate.  (*Post corrected July 21, 2019- Chatham Kent, Niagara region and others have also experienced water quality issues with wind projects)

Pressure applied at Queen’s Park for C-K Water Well Probe

Please see July 19, 2019 announcement  made by MPP Monte McNaughton copied below.

It  has not escaped notice no mention is made by the Province  with the association of changes in water quality with the wind project.

July 19, 2019

Ontario Conducting Health Hazard Investigation

Province Creates Independent Panel of Scientists to Investigate Water Wells, Fulfilling Commitment

Chatham Kent — Ontario’s government for the people has formed an expert independent panel to investigate well water in Chatham Kent, MPP McNaughton announced today.

The five-member independent panel will determine if the water from private wells in Chatham-Kent is safe for consumption.

“Our government made a promise to strike this panel,” said McNaughton. “Today we are fulfilling that promise.”

The five-member independent panel will consist of four experienced toxicologists and one local geologist. All members are independent from government and are experienced toxicology professionals that have served on advisory committees.

The panel is empowered to take a fresh look at new samples collected from certain water wells in Chatham-Kent where residents have raised questions about water quality. Samples from up to 189 private wells will be taken by a third-party business and tested by a commercial laboratory.

The announcement fulfills a government commitment.

“Barely one year after this promise was made, we are fulfilling it,” said McNaughton. “And we’re doing it in a way that will inspire confidence from the people of this community. People can trust the results this independent panel delivers.”

BACKGROUND

The five independent experts comprising the panel are:

Dr. Keith Benn, PhD – A local geologist and past professor of geology at University of Ottawa.

Dr. Glenn Ferguson, PhD, QPRA – An environmental health scientist with 25 years experience in toxicology, epidemiology, and human health risk assessment.

Dr. Shelley A. Harris, PhD – An epidemiologist and associate professor at University of Toronto who specializes in exposure measurement.

Dr. Ron Brecher, PhD – A specialist in toxicology, risk assessment and risk communication.

Mark Chappel, MSc, DABT – A toxicologist with significant experience in supervising and managing comprehensive toxicity studies.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

John Fraser

John.Fraser@pc.ola.org

White-Tailed Eagle Collision with Industrial Wind Turbine

A wind turbine located at northern Hokkaido, Japan with a high risk of bird strikes was monitored using a webcam surveillance system that was activated during the daytime every day from December 2013 to March 2014, which was the wintering season for the white-tailed sea eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla). A collision carcass of the white-tailed sea eagle was observed at the wind turbine on January 29, 2014 at 15:00. On analysis of the recorded data, we found that the moment of the collision was captured by both cameras.”

Turbine strike of White-tailed Eagle January 29, 2014
(Video 13 seconds length)

Unser Dorf hat Zukunft? Oder werden unsere Dörfer zerstört?/Our village has a future? Or are our villages destroyed?
(Video 4:59 minutes)

Wind Turbine Fire in Nova Scotia

What happens to neighbours’ properties when they have toxic material strewn all over their fields?  When livestock graze on their shard-like pieces or walk on them?

CBC News|Wind turbine catches fire in West Pubnico|Mar.19.2019

Huge turbine threw burning hunks of material 100 metres to the ground

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A wind turbine in West Pubnico caught fire late Friday afternoon. (Frankie Crowell)

CBC News · Posted: Mar 16, 2019 10:08 AM

A wind turbine in West Pubnico caught fire late Friday afternoon. (Frankie Crowell)

A wind turbine caught fire in West Pubnico, N.S., late Friday afternoon, throwing huge, burning pieces of material to the ground.

Firefighters were called to the scene around 5 p.m., but West Pubnico fire department Chief Gordon Amiro said there was little firefighters could do to douse the flames.

“We couldn’t get nowhere near because the blades was still turning, so, and pieces was breaking off the blades,” he said. “So if a piece was to fall off, it would go a long ways with the wind and that. So it wasn’t safe to go nowhere near the tower at all.”

No one was injured.

Amiro said when the blades turn, the tips are more than 100 metres up in the air — too high to fight the fire from the ground.

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Firefighters say there was nothing they could do to put out the fire on the turbine because it was too high in the air for them to reach. (Frankie Crowell)

“There was nothing we could do more than watch what was falling down and if the ground was to catch fire, just to put it out on the ground.”

Firefighters say there was nothing they could do to put out the fire on the turbine because it was too high in the air for them to reach. (Frankie Crowell)

Amiro said two of the blades were completely burned and the nacelle, the gearbox at the centre of the blades that’s “almost as big as a school bus” was also seriously damaged.

Firefighters stayed at the scene for about an hour to ensure no one got too close.

Amiro said it’s a good thing it was raining and the ground was covered with snow.

“If that would have been August, we’d still be there trying to put wood fire out,” he said Saturday morning.

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Firefighters kept people away from the area during the fire due to falling pieces of burning material. (Frankie Crowell)

Firefighters kept people away from the area during the fire due to falling pieces of burning material. (Frankie Crowell)

Source: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/wind-turbine-fire-west-pubnico-1.5059425

FIRE SAFETY SCIENCE-PROCEEDINGS OF THE ELEVENTH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM pp. 983-995

COPYRIGHT © 2014 INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR FIRE SAFETY SCIENCE/ DOI: 10.3801/IAFSS.FSS.11-983984

“The fire problem in wind turbines arises as a result of large amounts of highly flammable materials (hydraulic oil and lubricants, composite materials, insulation, and polymers) contained within the nacelle of the wind turbine and packed in close proximity to potential ignition sources such as overheated mechanical components (hot surfaces) and electrical connections that could fail [8-12].

Once a fire is ignited in a wind turbine, the situation rapidly escalates because the high wind favoured by turbine locations enhances the supply of oxygen and, hence, the fire growth. In over 90% of wind turbine fires reported, a total loss of the wind turbine, or at least, a severe structural failure of the major components (blades, nacelle, mechanical or electrical components) has been reported[8].

Moreover, even in the case of rapid detection, the fire brigade cannot intervene because of the turbine height[9, 10, 12], and for offshore wind turbines it is impractical to send response teams to fight the fire[9]. Under high wind conditions, burning debris from the turbine may fall on nearby vegetation and start forest fires or cause serious damage to property (see Fig. 4)[10]

The nacelle can house a huge amount of flammable liquids including gearbox oil, transformer oil, hydraulics fluids and other lubricants. For example, in a single 1.5MW wind turbine, up to 900 litres of lubricating oil including cooling and cleaning fluids can be stored inside the nacelle”

https://www.iafss.org/publications/fss/11/983/view/fss_11-983.pdf

 

 

Green Job~ Carrion Collector

Looking for work?  Need a job?

Wanna work in the clean green, environmentally sustainable renewable energy field?   Gotta a lead on a job for you!

Wildlife Field Technician  19400000926 
Summary

 

Tetra Tech Inc. is a leading provider of consulting, engineering, and technical services worldwide. Our reputation rests on the technical expertise and dedication of our employees—17,000 people working together across disciplines and time zones to provide smart, sustainable solutions for challenging projects. We are proud to be home to leading technical experts in water, environment, infrastructure, resource management, energy, and international development. Tetra Tech combines the resources of a global, multibillion-dollar company with local, client-focused delivery in 412 locations around the world. We offer competitive compensation and benefits and are searching for innovative people to join our teams.
 
Tetra Tech, Inc. is currently seeking a Wildlife Field Technician working as an avian and bat fatality monitor near Minot, ND.  Field work for this part-time position includes working 35-40 hours every other week in spring, summer, fall, and once each month in winter.
 
The field work begins mid-March 2019 and continues through March 2020, with the possibility of a second year of surveys.  Fatality monitoring applicants must be willing to commit to 3 full field days every other week, including daily travel to and from the field location. The technicians will be responsible for their own housing throughout the study period. 
 
ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:
  • The primary responsibility of this position is to implement a post-construction fatality monitoring program at an operational wind facility
  • The program is inclusive of fatality searches, adhering to standardized protocols as trained, and keeping detailed datasheets
  • Candidates who have previous field experience with birds and/or bats are preferred
  • Candidates must be able to walk for extended periods of time, be able to effectively handle exposure to weather extremes, and interaction with bird and bat carcasses
  • Field technicians may work independently and must be able to communicate and coordinate effectively with other field crew members, Tetra Tech supervisors, and site management
  • Field Technicians will be required to follow all wind facility-specific and Tetra Tech safety protocols and will be expected to provide their own suitable footwear (reinforced-toed hiking boots) and weather appropriate field gear
  • Salary will be commensurate with experience
Qualifications
EDUCATION, EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATION:
  • Bachelor’s degree in natural resources, wildlife management, wildlife biology or equivalent degree preferred
  • Individuals currently seeking degree and/or other enthusiastic workers are encouraged to apply
  • Good bird and/or bat identification skills for species in the region
  • Prior field experience with wildlife
  • Must be able to work independently and with others, and interact positively with project managers, clients, and landowners
  • Experience with 4×4 vehicles, valid driver’s license and clean driving record
  • Valid driver’s license is required
  • Skilled use of topographic maps, GPS units, and other field equipment
  • Must be able to follow instructions from manager and collect precise and thorough data
  • Must be able to work with electronic data collection protocols and data submission timing requirements
  • Must be skilled with communication, have the ability to maintain positive attitude and to accept guidance and constructive criticism
  • Investigation into driving record will be conducted upon hire
  • Driving record must meet standards set to operate motor vehicle on behalf of Tetra Tech
  • Background check will be conducted on final candidates
  • Candidates must be able to pass drug screen prior to employment
 

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Silence Lost

I’m frigging miserable again with the screeching in my head

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OMG. The tinnitus.  BLARING.

I can’t stay focused.

I can’t enjoy reading.

It disturbs my sleep and makes getting to sleep difficult.

I pace the floor unable to relax with the screeching in my head.

Silence is lost.

Tinnitus: one of the many adverse health impact of industrial scale wind turbines and their infrastructure placed too close to my home.

I have never ever experienced this in my life.  This is not a soft buzz as some have asked, this is blaring high pitched frequencies in my ears that consume moments and alter my tolerance and behaviour.

Accountability must be realized, for those who are injured and who suffer from this corrosive government plot.

Stop the harm.  Stop the industrial wind turbines.

Not Done Fighting

Not done fighting turbines, conservationists say

Frustrated by what they say are thousands of unreported bird and bat deaths, activists are calling for the new provincial government to take a closer look at the hundreds of wind turbines that dot rural Ontario.

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LOUIS PIN Updated: September 28, 2018|London Free Press

Frustrated by what they say are thousands of unreported bird and bat deaths, activists are calling for the new provincial government to take a closer look at the hundreds of wind turbines that dot rural Ontario.

These conservationists want the Environment Ministry to scrutinize what they say are flawed environmental assessments on the province’s existing turbines, saying the huge industrial windmills are responsible for tens of thousands of bird and bat deaths across Ontario each year

These deaths, they say, are not counted properly.

Part of that could be chalked up to Ontario’s regulations: large turbines can tower more than 150 metres high but the province only requires inspectors, when counting bird and bat deaths, to measure 50 metres from each base.

“A lot of the birds that get hit are flung well beyond that point,” Brian Salt, owner of the Mount Brydges animal rehabilitation clinic Salthaven, said. “They’re not counted in that survey.”……

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Lake Erie ecosystem under threat by off shore wind turbines

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The Blade|By:Steve Pollack|August 11, 2018

Proposed Icebreaker wind project is not what it seems

It is hard to know where to start dissecting the slick spin-doctoringrecently published in The Blade’s Op-Ed pages by LEEDCo, the Lake Erie Energy Development Corp., which wants to erect North America’s first freshwater offshore wind-turbines in central Lake Erie off Cleveland.

So-doing would reach far beyond the scope of a newspaper “op-ed.” Beth Nagusky, LEEDCo’s director of sustainable development, is a master at cherrypicking and parading obscure statements as a fait-accompli. Her contentions about the goodness of the proposed six-unit Icebreaker Wind power-generation project, some seven miles offshore, lie between premature and erroneous.

RELATED: Turbines are part of a clean energy future for northern Ohio

They are a masterful act of dissembling, distraction, distortion, and deception. Perhaps “MisLEEDCo” would more appropriate.

Ms. Nagusky has posited that Icebreaker’s towering turbines would kill few birds and bats, a claim that simply does not hold up under scrutiny. This is shown clearly for anyone who assesses it thoughtfully.

LEEDCo is betting on the glitter of such buzz-words as “economic impact, jobs, and clean energy” to substantiate its stance that somehow the pre-construction research on Icebreaker’s impact is all said and done and we can gleefully ride off into a lovely green-energy future. Wrong.

It claims that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has declared the project a low risk to birds and bats. Wrong again. The Service ruled that the project only posed a low risk to a few particular endangered species. It rejected the initial Icebreaker environmental assessment (EA), citing several insufficiencies in regard to birds and bats. The final EA has yet to be filed. No one, including LEEDCo, has seen it yet.

Among other unsettled issues, the required technology to monitor post-construction bird and bat mortality simply does not exist. And additional studies, including meaningful radar studies of migrations through the turbine zone, should be mandatory.

In its sugarcoating, LEEDCo ignores saying that the initial six units are just the tip of the iceberg. If the Ohio Power Siting Board and related agencies give the green light, this project opens a Pandora’s Box to hundreds or thousands more turbines on Lake Erie and the other Great Lakes. Any negative impacts would be magnified by orders of magnitude.

The state of New York has issued a moratorium on offshore wind for just such considerations, as has the province of Ontario, which alone has put 1,250 proposed offshore Erie wind turbines “on hold” while it assesses Icebreaker deliberations. Do you think that the giant Fred Olsen Renewables, of Oslo, Norway, would bother with building just six units here? The big money lies in hundreds. A proposed “buildout” after Icebreaker may run to 1,600 turbines.

So this really is not just six little old turbines and a few dead birds and bats. The migratory pathway and wintering grounds of millions of birds, and migratory bats as well, lie in the paths of a potential phalanx of towering 500-foot rotors. Out of sight, out of mind, is no justification.

LEEDCo is counting on the public not bothering with facts. Ms. Nagusky singled out Black Swamp Bird Observatory (BSBO) for its criticism of poor, incomplete science that LEEDCo’s hired-gun consultants have proffered about unknown and likely devastating impacts of arrays of offshore turbines. This in the heart of what the National Audubon Society and BirdLife International has declared a Globally Important Bird Area.

The Ohio Power Siting Board staff has attached a daunting list of conditions to its preliminary analysis. Last October, contrary to LEEDCo pretentions, the USF&WS argued that a still-unapproved environmental assessment is insufficient. Instead a more serious, detailed, environmental impact statement should be drawn. Yet LEEDCo proselytizes incorrectly that a waffling preliminary assessment means that Icebreaker is clean and green.

BSBO’s analysis has been dogged over many months. Its conservation committee includes a professional engineer, an environmental law attorney, and no less than three lifetime professional wildlife and fisheries biologists. Contentions down Cleveland-way that the anti-LEEDCo campaign is an animal of the beleaguered coal industry is just another distraction. The project needs to stand on its own scientific merits, not smoke-and-mirrors……

This project should be stayed unless or until it can assure minimal wildlife impacts based on the most rigorous science. The public should thoughtfully educate itself on the project before forming opinion. Icebreaker is the first small wave in a floodtide. Read the record, not just a “windustry” spin-doctor’s selective fantasizing.

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