Our Hour of Greatest Need

green energy light bulb

By:  Catherine Mitchell-
A Concerned Citizen

Opinions expressed are of the author

 

September 25th, 2017

In times of greatest need it is always wise to know whom you can call on. The same applies to the electricity system and it is rather telling what was produced by each generator type in our hour of greatest need. The ‘Peak Demand’ for electricity in 2017 in Ontario occurred on September 25, 2017 at 5:00 PM.

Ontario can produce power from nuclear, natural gas, hydro, wind, solar and biofuel energy generators and the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) is responsible for the management of the resources in the system. The following chart looks at production from each fuel type during the peak demand at 5:00 PM Sept 25, 2017 to determine the adequacy of resources to meet the demand.

Generation Capacity (MW/hr) / Capability @ Peak / Output/Sept 25, 2017

Fuel Type A   Total Installed

Capacity (MW/hr)

B  Forecast Capability      @Peak

(MW/hr)

C    OutPut

Jan – Aug 31

2017

(MW/hr)

D Sept 25,2017

5:00 PM

(MW/hr)

Sept 25,  2017

Contribution

as %

Nuclear 13,009 MW  11,537 MW   7548  MW    9690  MW       48%
Hydro      8480       5786        3207    5135       25%
Natural Gas    10,277       8371          417    5268       26%
Wind       4213        533          764        67        0.3%
Solar         380          38            50        85        0.4%
Biofuel         495        439            37      100       0.4%
Total    36,853  MW/hr   26,704     MW/hr     12,023

MW/hr

 20,345 MW/hr

IESO  report – 18 Month Outlook: An Assessment of the Reliability and Operability of the Ontario Electricity System from October 2017 to March 2019:   http://www.ieso.ca/en/sector-participants/planning-and-forecasting/18-month-outlook       Page 17 -Table 4.1 provides (A) total installed capacity and the (B) forecast capability @ outlook peak.

To keep the lights on, refrigerators running and industry rolling in our hour of greatest need on September 25, 2017 at 5:00 PM we needed 21,786 MW of power. The Ontario power generators produced 20,345 MW of power and we imported 1,441 MW from Manitoba and Quebec. (It seems like natural gas generators could have been ramped up an additional 1,500 MW per hour without exceeding the IESO forecast capability at peak, but we imported power instead.)

Nuclear, one of the baseload generators for Ontario, did most of the heavy lifting and came through producing 9690 MW of power or 48% of the power produced in Ontario. This is higher than the average yearly production of 7548 MW/hr but less than the maximum capability of the nuclear plants.

Hydro – our baseload renewable energy source – produced 5135 MW of power from a potential of 5786 MW. So we were using 89% of the potential production from our cleanest, greenest, cheapest energy source. The average hourly demand from hydro is 3207 MW/hr and generally we spill water over the dams and waste that renewable energy resource. But in our hour of greatest need hydro provided 25% of the power produced in Ontario.

Natural gas, another baseload power generator that can be quickly ramped up or down, provided 5268 MW of power in our hour of greatest need. Natural gas is definitely our BFF (best friend forever). According to the IESO gas plants are capable of producing 8,371 MW of power each hour, yet on average the natural gas plants produce 417 MW of power each hour. From January – August 2017 the gas plants operated at 4.9 % of their potential!! This means that they are being underutilized and sit idle the majority of the time. But on September 25 at 5:00 PM the gas plants provided 26% of the power produced in Ontario.

And then we get to the contribution of the energy of the future – wind and solar!

The total installed nameplate capacity of all the industrial wind turbines in Ontario is 4213 MW. So the IWT’s should have made a significant contribution. But in our hour of greatest need the total power produced from all the IWT’s installed in Ontario was 67 MW!!! This represents a total contribution of 0.3% of the power produced in Ontario. Power that was required to keep the lights on, the refrigerators running and the industry rolling. Solar made a bigger contribution of 85 MW or 0.4% of the power produced in Ontario.

To understand the limits of wind power, the late Glenn R. Schleede, formerly Vice President of New England Electric System, Executive Associate Director of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, Senior VP of the National Coal Association in Washington and Associate Director (Energy and Science) of the White House Domestic Council says it best: “Wind turbines have little or no ‘capacity value’ because they are unlikely to be producing electricity at the time of peak electricity demand. Therefore, wind turbines cannot substitute for conventional generating capacity responsible for providing reliable electricity to customers.”

According to Schleede, the true capacity value of a wind turbine or ‘wind farm’ is generally less than 10% of nameplate capacity and often 0% or slightly above — simply because, at the time of peak electricity demand, the wind isn’t blowing at a speed that will permit the turbine to produce any or much electricity. Claims of wind turbine capacity value have been exaggerated by wind industry officials and lobbyists, and by regulatory agencies. As we are finding out in Ontario – industrial wind turbines generate a minimal amount of electricity.

Wind and solar are both intermittent so we can not ramp them up or even depend on them for power because they only produce power when the wind is blowing or the sun is shining.

Wind and solar certainly let us down in our hour of greatest need!

Wind Turbine Study Recruitment Begins

kincardine

Recruitment is now underway for the new wind turbine study.

This study has been reviewed and received research ethics clearance through a University of Waterloo Research Ethics Committee (ORE 22115). However, the decision to participate is yours.

The Huron County Health Unit Medical Officer of Health will not be writing an order under section 13 of the Health Protection and Promotion Act. A single study will not provide enough evidence to prove causality. Further, the Medical Officer of Health does not have the authority to write an order under section 13 of the Health Protection and Promotion Act to curtail or shut down wind turbines. An Ontario Health Services Appeal and Review Board decision and Ontario Superior Court of Justice judicial review outline the limits on a Medical Officer of Health’s authority to write orders.

You are eligible to participate if you are an English speaking Huron County resident and live within 10 km of a wind turbine. To see if your household is eligible, please view the eligibility map [PDF]. If you are having trouble opening the PDF, please see below.

If you live within five km of a wind turbine you will be mailed an information letter and consent form. If you live 5-10 km from a wind turbine you can still participate by reading the information letter on this website, downloading and printing the consent form, and returning the completed consent form to the Huron County Health Unit by mail or in person. You can also find copies of the information letter, consent form, parent permission form, child assent form, Registration Survey and Observation Diary at any branch of the Huron County Library. A copy of the map showing what areas of the county can participate in the study is also available at all branches of the Huron County Library.

For more information about this study

Goal Setting Retreat


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MAWT Logo Narrow

You are invited!

WLGWAG & MAWTi would like to extend a warm welcome to our goal setting retreat.

Facilitator: Georgina Richardson

Where: Silverdale Community Hal, 4610 Sixteen Rd, St. Ann’s
When: Saturday November 4, 2017 – 10am to 5pm

Topics for discussion:

  • What Works. What Has Not.
  • Short Term & Long Term Goal Setting.
  • Organizing Priorities.
  • Action Plans.

Have more you would like to discuss?
Please email Mary Kovacs to add to the discussion list.

Pot Luck Lunch: 12pm – 1pm

RSVP:  mkovacs@vaxxine.com

Rural Ontario- How did We become Enemies of the State?

 

Bad actors

RICK@WELLINGTONTIMES.CA

The image remains seared into the consciousness of everyone who witnessed the grotesque spectacle. The full power and fury of the state and its legal might, side by side with one of most powerful law firms in Canada, arrayed against the grey-haired volunteers of the Prince Edward County Field Naturalists. Five Goliaths against one David.

One side funded by taxpayers and corporate interests, the other by donations and the kindness of individuals in this community. One side working to forestall the demise of species at risk, the other side hungrily pursuing profits. Alongside them were government lawyers dispatched from Toronto to defeat the County’s Field Naturalists.

How did we get here? How did the people of Ontario become the enemy of the state?

Read article

protest picton

Infrasound tested as Scary Sound

abandoned-447x390What scares you?

Researchers continue testing infrasound impacts used in a haunted house setting and are analysing what will increase a fright response.

 

“Infrasound is a sound that’s below what we can hear, below 20 hertz. But you can still feel it. It’s like a low, rumbling base sound,” associate professor Rodney Schmaltz explained.

Infrasound is found and has been measured in homes being exposed to industrial wind turbines noise emissions. Reported adverse health symptoms of impacted residents adjacent to industrial wind turbines mirror many of the reactions observed by researchers looking to increase the spook experience when using infrasound.

Half of the volunteers would go through with the low frequency noise, half would go through without it.

“The hair on the back of your neck goes up; you feel something.”

“You might go, ‘Oh, it’s a ghost!’ When in fact it’s just infrasound,” Schmaltz said.

Researchers test scary sounds at Deadmonton haunted house

By: Sarah Kraus
Reporter Global News
October 20, 2017

With Halloween just around the corner, researchers are using Edmonton’s scariest haunted house to test a theory on how sound contributes to fear.

MacEwan University professors chose to conduct their study at Deadmonton in the old Paramount Theatre for the second year in a row.

In its fourth year in Alberta’s capital, Deadmonton is known for providing a thrill.

“You can basically expect an intense, very scary walk-through experience, like you’ve never experienced before,” explained owner Ryan Kozar.

“It’s not like the old haunted house rides that you’d see at the fair back in the day.”

He normally tries to spook all of the senses in the haunted house.

“You walk into the summoning room — there’s cemetery sounds. You go through the woods, the swamp scene — there’s swap sounds, there’s crickets. It brings it all to life. There might be some scents in there, too.”

Researchers from MacEwan University are especially interested in analyzing the impact of an inaudible sound.

Read article
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Rally Draws Hundreds

Picton rally 1

By Tim Miller, The Intelligencer
Sunday, October 15, 2017

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY — On Sunday opponents of wind turbine development in the County took to the streets to show that their concerns over a proposed wind energy project are about more than just a lot of air.

Hundreds of sign-waving and chanting residents marched down Main Street Picton shortly after the noon hour to kick off an anti-wind rally.

Upon reaching The Regent Theatre, marchers doffed their signs and settled in for the nearly three-hour town hall meeting to begin.

While people took their seats a video montage of anti-wind messages written by County residents in black marker on a stark white scroll of paper played on the big screen, followed by aerial drone footage of levelled and torn up fields. Over the montage played the melodic version of Dee Snider’s We’re Not Going to Take It.

Sunday’s town hall was in regards to the ongoing wpd Canada’s White Pines Wind Project which initially called for the erection of 29 wind turbines in the County.

The County has declared itself an unwilling host to industrial wind turbine projects that disrupt the lives and livelihoods of County residents and destroy the County’s historic landscapes while causing irreparable harm to the County’s wildlife and natural environment.

Because of challenges by local government and groups the initial plan of 29 turbines has been scaled back to nine — to be built near the south shore of Milford.

On stage activists sat beside entrepreneurs, doctors and local politicians. Their reasons for opposing the project was as varied as their backgrounds.

Dr Robert McMurtry, former Dean of Medicine at Western University and a member of the Order of Canada, spoke about the health impact turbines can have when placed too close to residential homes.

Read rest of article

Information Meeting- Huron County Wind Turbine Study

huron county Wind-Turbines
Industrial wind turbines, Huron County Ontario

By John Chippa     October 13, 2017

A date has been set for a public information meeting about a wind turbine study, being conducted by the Huron County Health Unit.

The session will present details on the upcoming study regarding reported human health concerns associated with living near industrial wind turbines.

The meeting is being held on Thursday, October 26th in the auditorium of the Health Unit’s complex, just south of Clinton.    It starts at 7:00 p.m.

Seating is limited, so you are asked to call the health unit at 519-482-3416 and dial ‘0’ to speak to the receptionist about attending.

Epidemiologist Erica Clark explains they’ll start recruiting participants for the study in a few weeks.

“We’ll be looking for people that are Huron County residents that live within ten kilometres of a wind turbine and we want to talk to both people that do have difficulties with wind turbines and also those that do not. We are very much interested in speaking with people who have both perspective”, says Dr. Clark.

“What we’re looking to do with the analysis is see if we can find some environmental factors that might account for why we have some households that are experiencing a number of difficulties with the wind turbines and then we have other households that report that they’re doing just fine.”

Read article

Read more about the Huron County Health Unit Wind Turbine Study

It’s time to march in the streets!

prince edward county destruction

A Rally and Town Hall Meeting to demand the cancellation of wpd Canada’s White Pines Wind Project in South Marysburgh

Sunday, October 15th in Picton

March (rain or shine):

1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. down Main Street, Picton. Assemble on Cold Storage Road in Picton by 12:30 p.m. and bring along your personalized sign, placard or poster.

Meeting:

2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Regent Theatre

Learn how the 9-turbine White Pines Wind Project WILL affect you and Prince Edward County, and what you can do to help. Local politicians, County residents, business people and experts will provide impact statements, updates, and answer your questions about: loss of landowner and municipal rights because of the Green Energy Act; human health effects; destruction of heritage, tourism and endangered species; and other concerns.

Speakers:

Mayor Robert Quaiff; MPP Todd Smith; Winemaker Norman Hardie; Wind Concerns Ontario President, Jane Wilson; Dr. Robert McMurtry OC; and other knowledgeable individuals. Moderated by Councillor Steve Ferguson

Contact logistics coordinator Les Stanfield at 613.476.5363 or Contact Councillor Steve Ferguson at 613.827.7174 or sferguson@pecounty.on.ca

Your participation really matters!

CCSAGE Naturally Green

Legal proceedings commenced

Press Release:  APPEC

October 11, 2017   Prince Edward County, Ontario

The Alliance to Protect Prince Edward County (APPEC) has commenced legal proceedings naming the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) and WPD White Pines Wind Inc. (WPD) as respondents. APPEC alleges that the Feed-In-Tariff (FIT) contract between the IESO and WPD should have been terminated as soon as it became evident that WPD would be unable or incapable of fulfilling the FIT contract terms.  These FIT contract terms have been made publicly available and are well known.

In 2010, a FIT contract for 60MW wind energy project to be operational within three (3) years was offered by the Ontario Power Authority (now the IESO) to WPD.   The contract allowed for termination if the project was not able to deliver at least 75% of the contracted power. A Renewable Energy Approval (REA) was granted to WPD by the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) five years later in 2015.   Immediately after the MOECC approval, an appeal was made by APPEC to the Environmental Review Tribunal (ERT). In 2016 the ERT found that the project would cause serious and irreversible harm to the natural environment.  After allowing the proponent an opportunity to propose additional mitigation measures to prevent this harm, the ERT still found it necessary to remove 18 of the 27 wind turbines from the project.  As a result, the project is only permitted to erect nine (9) 2.05 MW turbines which can only fulfill approximately 30% of the original FIT contract requirement, far less than the 75% referred to under the contract.

APPEC has made an application to the Ontario Superior Court of Justice seeking a declaration that the FIT contract for the White Pines Wind Project is null and void and an injunction on any further work on the White Pines Wind project. A hearing on this matter is currently scheduled for November 17th, 2017 at 44 Union Street, Picton, Ontario K0K 2T0 at 10:00 a.m.

Protecting our children from Industrial Wind Power Emissions is our first priority!

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