Lake Erie Groups Rev Up Opposition

Cleveland.com| By Laura Johnston| April 15, 2019

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Lake Erie Shoreline

Lake Erie groups rev up opposition to Cleveland wind turbine project, as developers negotiate with state

CLEVELAND, Ohio – The project has been on the horizon for a decade and a half: six wind turbines erected in Lake Erie, in the first freshwater wind project in North America.

But fervor over the issue is revving up now among boaters, as the developer, the nonprofit Lake Erie Energy Development Co., works through stipulations with the state.

The Lake Erie Marine Trades Association — made up of boat dealers, clubs and other enthusiasts — opposes the $126 million, 20.7-megawatt project dubbed Icebreaker, planned for 8 miles north of Cleveland. So does the nonprofit Lake Erie Foundation.

Both LEEDCo. and its opponents point to hundreds of pages of documents they say prove their points.

The fight is not so much over the six turbines up for state approval right now – but for the wind farm it could precipitate: thousands of spinning blades the Lake Erie Foundation fears will desecrate Lake Erie.

LEEDCo. CEO Lorry Wagner says there are “currently no plans” for more turbines. “You can have all the dreams and aspirations you want, but until you climb that first hill and see what’s out there, you better focus on that first hill.”

But Icebreaker is a pilot project, with a $40 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. LEEDCo. has partnered with Norway-based Fred Olsen Renewables, and its website says “we can build an industry and supply chain in Northeast Ohio that will creation 8,000 new good paying jobs and pump nearly $14 billion into our economy by 2030… as the industry grows here.”

An expansion would require more studies and more approvals.

Said foundation board member John Lipaj: “You cannot treat this as a six-turbine stand-alone project. We have to be realistic and treat it for what it is.”……

READ MORE HERE

No wind turbines on Great Lakes

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Wolfe Island Wind Turbines

Boating Industry|April 9, 2019

MBIA urges boaters to voice their opposition to wind turbines in the Great Lakes

The Michigan Boating Industries Association, along with environmental groups, boating associations, and property owners are urging boaters to raise their voice in opposition of the proposed Icebreaker wind power turbines in Lake Erie.

Nicki Polan, executive director of MBIA says: “MBIA is not opposed to alternative sources of energy. But, regarding wind farms in our Great Lakes, we find far too many unanswered questions and documented risks to the health and aesthetics of these unique and often times fragile bodies of water. We stand opposed to plans such as the one being considered in Ohio now and we encourage all boaters and boating businesses to join us in communicating this to Ohio.”

Michigan borders on four of the five Great Lakes including a large portion of Lake Erie. Many Michigan residents’ boat on Lake Erie, and many Michigan businesses and citizens live and work along its shores.

Only 2.5% of the world’s water is fresh water, and 20% of that is coming from the Great Lakes.

“Building wind turbines in Lake Erie will threaten clean water, boating access, one of the world’s best perch and walleye fisheries, bird migration, the safety and health of coastal residents, and so much more,” said Polan.

The initial goal of the Icebreaker plan is to place 6 wind turbines, with a final goal of 1,200 wind turbines in Lake Erie, costing an estimated $24 billion.

“Wind power has proved to be very high cost with low return,” said MBIA Board Member Jim Coburn of Coburn & Associated in Macomb, Mich. “Many wind turbine projects in the U.S. and overseas have been abandoned because of this. Why this is even being considered in our Great Lakes is beyond me.”

The case against turbines is extensive, including the fact that exploding and burning turbines can be commonplace. Each turbine contains over 400 gallons of industrial lubricants in their gearboxes.Gearbox seals are known to fail and will leak oil into the waters below. But when they burn there is no way to reach and extinguish them. As the 300-foot turbine blades burn, they create toxic emissions polluting the air and waters below.

Source: Boating Industry

Why have people vacated their homes?

I often get this question: “Why have people vacated their homes, or are feeling sick, around windmills in Brown County”. This is not a unique scenario. Very large industrial-scale wind turbines placed irresponsibly close to families’ home have similar impacts worldwide. The impacts do not discriminate between young or old, rich or poor. Some people are more susceptible to the negative impacts (one consistent correlation is people who are sensitive to motion sickness).

This German video does a pretty good job describing the issue. Please note that the turbines in this video are MUCH smaller and less impactful than the 8 Duke Energy wind turbines in Glenmore that were unanimously declared a Human Health Hazard by the Brown County Government Board of Health.

Duke’s turbines in Brown County are among the largest in the country placed among the closest to homes. They are 493 feet tall and have 2.5 Megawatt generators (One megawatt = 1,000 kilowatts = 1,000,000 watts). You will also note that the turbines in this German video are over 700 meters (over 2,100 feet) from homes – the turbines in Glenmore are as close as 1,100 feet from homes.

Wisconsin Public Service (owned by We Energies) purchases the power from this project and it is regulated by the Town of Glenmore who apparently refuses to enforce the clear and protective language in their own ordinance and conditional use permit. Families are living away from the homes they still own; residents who can not move away have submitted affidavits attesting to the fact that they continue to feel severely ill when around the spinning turbines; and little is being done to bring any relief.

It breaks my heart to hear callous comments from well intentioned people that have not experienced the impacts in these homes first hand or even taken the time to talk with the impacted residents. The question I ask these people who don’t understand is why would people make this up. People do not leave the homes they still own and maintain for no reason. They do not want to sleep and do homework in their basements because it is the only place in their homes where they can get a little relief. They do not enjoy coming forward only to be the subject of ridicule and voluntarily devaluing their homes. The symptoms our neighbors express are shared world wide.

Even those profiting from renting land to wind developers have sued them because of claims of the unlivable conditions around the turbines. This is a social justice issue – Shirley Wind in Glenmore is arguably one of the most studied wind farms in the country and ample evidence is known on the conditions around these particular turbines. If you would like to know more, please don’t hesitate to call or write me – I can direct you to those that can provide the answers and have first hand experience. Hope some of this information is of value.

Thank you for reading this long post.

Steve Deslaurie, Brown County Supervisor
April 5, 2019

Source: Community for Steve Deslaurie,

 

White-Tailed Eagle Collision with Industrial Wind Turbine

A wind turbine located at northern Hokkaido, Japan with a high risk of bird strikes was monitored using a webcam surveillance system that was activated during the daytime every day from December 2013 to March 2014, which was the wintering season for the white-tailed sea eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla). A collision carcass of the white-tailed sea eagle was observed at the wind turbine on January 29, 2014 at 15:00. On analysis of the recorded data, we found that the moment of the collision was captured by both cameras.”

Turbine strike of White-tailed Eagle January 29, 2014
(Video 13 seconds length)

Unser Dorf hat Zukunft? Oder werden unsere Dörfer zerstört?/Our village has a future? Or are our villages destroyed?
(Video 4:59 minutes)

Charter Challenge Against Green Energy Act

The Green Energy Act is far from being repealed in Ontario.  The Charter Challenge led by CCSAGE continues on with the recent filing of a Notice of Application to proceed filed in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice.

Read Notice of Application here:

Source:
Notice of Application required to continue the Charter Challenge to the Green Energy Act by Alan Whiteley

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