Tag Archives: plympton wyoming

Plymptom Wyoming, Ontario, Mayor, Council, Issue Groundbreaking New Wind Turbine Noise By Law

turbine noise Canada Free Press,  By Guest Column Sherri Lange  October 18, 2014

Mayor Lonny Napper of Plympton Wyoming, Ontario, with his Chief Administrative Officer, Kyle Pratt, led his council to a “game changer” bylaw last week.  The wind turbine noise bylaw crafted by council and vetted with Toronto lawyer, Eric Gillespie, references Infrasound and Low Frequency Noise (ILFN) and pulsing barometric pressure changes that are now recognized to damage health around the world.

The bylaw references charging fees to developers if ILFN causes residents problems.  Common effects are from chronic unrelenting noise, sleep disorders, hormone level disruption, increased risk of disease, diabetes, hypertension, depression, heart arrhythmias, and possibly even cancer. (Carmen Krogh and Dr Robert McMurtry, both of Ontario,  recently published a case definition that accepts inner ear disruption, sleep disorders, hypertension, mood disorders, nausea, tinnitus, as part of the presenting complaints combined with proximity to wind turbines.)

In  Plympton Wyoming, complaints will lead to investigations and hefty fines. This is the first bylaw directly referencing ILFN and demanding fines of between $500 to $10,000 per day, and which may be, the bylaw states, in excess of $100,000.
While over 80 Ontario municipalities have called for a moratorium, declared themselves unwilling hosts, and have called for the resignation of the Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Arlene King, as well as variously creating new bylaws for longer setbacks and decommissioning costs, the Green Energy and Green Economy Act 2009 (GEA), subjugates most Ontario law under its wings, leaving communities scrambling to find ways to protect themselves.  Mayor Napper and his council have likely found the idea remedy: one that is not subsumed into the GEA.  Health issues cannot be found to be contrary to the GEA or “frustrate” the efforts of the laws to perpetuate wind turbine factories, or so-called “renewable energy platforms.”

“When I took an oath to protect my community, I took it very seriously,” continues Mayor Napper.  “The information about what other communities are suffering, disruption, noise, degradation of precious landscapes, seriously divided communities, and to see that this possible devastation is in my full view, for my residents, something has to give.”

Thank you Mayor Napper and Plymptom Wyoming council. Read the rest of the article here.

New bylaw will hold turbines companies to keep it down

The Independent  Oct 8,2014

Boralex%20Seigneurie%20de%20Beaupre%20wind%20farmSeigneurie de Beaupre Wind Farm (using Enercon windturbines)

Plympton-Wyoming’s proposed wind turbine noise bylaw is going where no regulation has gone before.

Council has given first and second reading to a bylaw which regulates the amount of noise coming from industrial wind projects. Council asked staff and the municipality’s lawyers to come up with the bylaw since much of the concern about the project has to do with the potential health effects of the noise coming from the turbine.

Clerk Brianna Coughlin says much of the regulation set out in the bylaw meets standards already set by the provincial government. “We can’t go beyond that,” she says.

But Plympton-Wyoming is going to hold the wind energy companies to a new standard. “The only difference (from the provincial standards) is the bylaw has mention of infra-sound which not regulated by the province right now,” says Couglin.

Infrasound is inaudible for most people but can be perceived by other senses and it is measurable according to some experts says Couglin.

Under the bylaw, if a resident complains about infra sound, the municipality would hire an engineer qualified to take the measurements before laying a charge.

Under the proposed bylaw, fines – if a company is found guilty – can range from $500 to $10,000 per offence and could exceed $100,000 if the offense continues. The municipality could also recoup the cost of the specialized testing under the bylaw.

Plympton-Wyoming Mayor Lonny Napper says that while Suncor Energy (which is developing the Cedar Point project in the municipality) has yet to comment on the inclusion of infrasound in the bylaw, he thinks it is necessary.

“We think it is our obligation to look after the health of the people,” he says. “You just can’t make rules and not cover everything.” Read rest of article here.

Julian Falconer to speak at wind energy town hall

Paul Morden – Sarnia Observer – April 22, 2014

Noted Canadian lawyer Julian Falconer is set to speak at a May 5 town hall meeting a Plympton-Wyoming citizens group is organizing to rally support for its fight against Suncor Energy’s proposed 46-turbine Cedar Point Wind Power Project.

Falconer, known for his human rights advocacy and involvement in high profile cases like the Ipperwash Inquiry, along with lawyer Asha James from Falconer’s firm, are set to speak at the meeting about Charter of Rights and Freedom challenges of wind energy projects.

“He knows how to make things happen and has quite a reputation,” said Ingrid Willemsen, with the group We’re Against Industrial Turbines – Plympton-Wyoming.

“We’re quite excited he’ll be there.”

The meeting is set for 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Camlachie Community Centre. Willemsen said group members hope to fill the hall and attract more residents to their cause.

“I think it’s about the only thing the community has left to hope for,” she said.

Suncor has a contract to sell power from its Cedar Point project to Ontario’s electricity grid, and has submitted an application for provincial environmental approval for turbines it plans to build in Plympton-Wyoming, Lambton Shores and Warwick Township.

Also scheduled to address the town hall meeting are Ben Lansink, a real estate appraiser and consultant, who will speak about the impact of turbines on property values, and Carmen Krogh, one of the authors of an article published in the Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine on the health impacts of wind farms.

Willemsen said the view of turbines going up along Highway 402, just east of Lambton County, is showing local residents what’s on the way to their communities, and may spur more opposition to wind projects.

“A lot of people have not involved themselves because they don’t know how it’s going to affect them,” she said. “They haven’t seen them, right close.”

As well as awaiting provincial environmental approval for its Cedar Point project, Suncor has taken the Town of Plympton-Wyoming to court over several of its bylaws aimed at wind turbines.

Earlier this month, Suncor officials met with town council after the judge hearing the case asked the two sides to explore the possibility of a settlement.

Mayor Lonny Napper said Tuesday councillors were still waiting to hear back from the town’s lawyer before responding to Suncor.

Willemsen said she remains hopeful Suncor’s wind project can be stopped.

“They need to jump through the hoops, just like any other project, and the longer it’s delayed, the better our chances,” she said.

See original article here: http://www.theobserver.ca/2014/04/22/julian-falconer-to-speak-at-wind-energy-town-hall

PoV: Democracy thrives . . . at the local level

By Peter Epp, Chatham Daily News – Wednesday July 17, 2013

Byelections are to be held on Aug. 1, in which the votes of residents in five different ridings will be tabulated, but it’s not likely their outcome will have a great bearing on the next government, which right now is being propped up by the New Democrats. Yet if Premier Kathleen Wynne’s Liberals do poorly, it will be a stunning slap against her government and its policies.

Oddly enough, votes have also been taken across rural Ontario over the past six months and, as with the Aug. 1 byelection, their outcome has had little impact on the governing Liberals.

Dozens of municipalities have been declaring themselves to be non-willing hosts to wind turbine development, in a desperate bid to become heard in Queen’s Park.

The latest declaration comes from Dawn-Euphemia Township. On Monday, the township council voted to become a non-willing host. Although there are no turbines in Dawn-Euphemia, two companies have proposals to erect a total of approximately 70 towers.

There are now over 60 municipalities in Ontario that are non-willing hosts. Several are in Lambton County, including Plympton-Wyoming and, more recently, Enniskillen Townshp. Continue Reading at http://www.chathamdailynews.ca/2013/07/17/pov-democracy-thrives—-at-the-local-level