Tag Archives: nuclear power

Less nuclear means more greenhouse gases

John Spears Toronto Star

Deciding not to build new nuclear reactors will drive Ontario’s carbon emissions back to 2005 levels, says a McMaster University professor.

John Luxat, professor of nuclear safety analysis, told the Economic Club that foregoing nuclear in favour of renewable energy comes at the price of higher greenhouse gas emissions.

Ontario has said it won’t proceed with construction of two proposed new units at the Darlington nuclear station.

At the same time, the province is expanding renewable generation such as wind and solar.

Luxat, who worked for many years in Ontario’s nuclear power sector, said the problem with wind and solar is that they are intermittent, depending on weather. That means they require back-up to fill the gaps – a function largely performed in Ontario by natural gas-fired generators, which emit carbon dioxide.

Read the article here.

John Spears mentions in the article how Germany has again turned to burning coal in response to the intermittency of wind and solar.

The result will be a rebound in its carbon emissions, Luxat said, as the Germans fill the gap with coal and coal-backed renewables.

That option will not be open to us here in Ontario as our Premier Wynne is on a mission to outlaw the use of coal.

http://wolfhillblog.wordpress.com/2013/11/22/ontarios-team-agenda-21-wynnes-approval-from-climate-huckster-al-gore/

http://blazingcatfur.blogspot.ca/2013/11/great-liar-kim-dong-wynne-great-fat.html

And read this article for a laugh.  It made me feel better.

http://www.torontosun.com/2013/11/28/premier-kathleen-wynnes-wife-calls-for-funds-to-run-ad

French Tilt Against More Wind Farms

The Japan Times  Nov. 18 2013

PARIS – Plans to dot France with wind farms are facing fierce opposition from critics worried they will blight a landscape that has helped make the country the world’s top tourist destination.

France relies heavily on nuclear power but is working to shift to renewable energy sources and triple by 2020 its number of wind turbines from the current 4,000 that are spread across 1,127 sites.

But opponents are urging the government to tread carefully so as not to damage France’s thousands of kilometers of stunningly beautiful countryside — which range from Europe’s longest strip of beaches to the peaks of the Alps.

Some critics have already won court cases outlawing turbines, and more legal challenges are on the way.

Read rest of article here.