Niagara Wind Project Ownership changes blowing in the wind.

Boralex acquires an option for a 25% interest in a wind power project in Ontario

unnamedMONTRÉAL, June 8, 2015 /PRNewswire/ – Boralex Inc. (“Boralex” or the “Corporation”) (TSX: BLX) announced the signature of a conditional buy/sell option for a 25% economic interest in the 230 MW Niagara Region Wind Farm project in which Enercon is the majority owner (the “Option”). The total investment planned for this major undertaking is between $900 million and $950 million and Boralex will immediately begin coordination of the project construction phase in partnership with Enercon.

Extending across the Regional Municipality of Niagara, the Township of West Lincoln, the Town of Wainfleet and Haldimand County inOntario, the Niagara Region Wind Farm project will comprise 77 3 MW Enercon turbines and construction will begin in June.

Boralex will have the obligation to exercise the Option if certain financial conditions are met at the time of signature of a project financing agreement. If unexercised at that time, Boralex will be entitled to exercise the Option at its discretion following commercial commissioning of the project. The Corporation expects that $60 million in equity will be needed to exercise the Option. Boralex will be the project operator following exercise of the Option. The initial consideration paid by Boralex in connection with the acquisition of this Option will be approximately $5 million, which will primarily consist of a deposit payable to Enercon.

More Turbines Threaten Haldimand Horizons

download (1)Haldimand county states it is an unwilling host but like a bad and unwanted smell even more wind projects keep blowing back in.  The current project- Townsend Wind, failed as a co -operative venture but is back as a new proposal and seeking endorsement.  The public “we tell you” meeting is scheduled for June 23, 2015 7-9 pm at the Jarvis Lions Club, 118 James St, in Jarvis.

Haldimand County states it is a non-willing host but has 205 industrial wind turbines and counting located within its boundaries.

“NOW THEREFORE be it resolved that Haldimand County Council will not be providing local municipal support to any application that will construct industrial wind turbines in Haldimand County.”

Haldimand- February 14, 2013

Time will tell if the tidal wave of invasive turbines has ebbed.

Townsend Wind Farm:

http://www.swebdevelopment.ca/

Are wind farms really noisy? What does a wind farm sound like?

The Listening Room Experience

What is the Listening Room Experience?

Are wind farms really noisy?  What does a wind farm sound like?

The primary aim of the exercise is to broaden understanding of wind farm noise. Whilst the issues surrounding wind farm noise are greatly discussed and debated, it has been experienced by relatively few in the profession or by those responsible for influencing the decision of whether nearby residents will experience this noise and if so to what extent.

The listening room experience aims to replicate listening to wind farm noise, particularly AM (Amplitude Modulation), in a home situation. Clips of wind farm noise are taken from MAS Environmental’s own measurements in the field and within dwellings where complaints of wind farm noise have been made.

MAS feel that there is a specific need to hear and experience wind farm noise and amplitude modulation not necessarily because of the decibel level of the noise, but largely due to the character of the noise – the changing frequency content and its context within what is usually a very quiet rural environment.

read more: http://www.masenv.co.uk/listening_room#item159

‘We are not activists’

PORT RYERSE – Port Ryerse residents fighting against wind turbines slated to go up beside their village are protesting because of the certainty the project will harm them, an environmental tribunal hearing heard.

 

Port Ryerse residents protested as members of an environmental tribunal hearing into the case of wind turbines proposed for a field next to their village visited the site on Wednesday, June 3, 2015. From left to right are: Mary Goodlet, Bill Irvin, Stew Smith, and Shana Greatrix. (DANIEL R. PEARCE Simcoe Reformer)
Port Ryerse residents protested as members of an environmental tribunal hearing into the case of wind turbines proposed for a field next to their village visited the site on Wednesday, June 3, 2015. From left to right are: Mary Goodlet, Bill Irvin, Stew Smith, and Shana Greatrix. (DANIEL R. PEARCE Simcoe Reformer)

Sleeplessness, sickness, loss of birds, and falling real estate values have hit every community that has ever hosted turbines, Port Ryerse resident Heather Walters testified.

“These are not guesses,” she said. “It is 100% predictable.”

Walters said she is not normally an outspoken advocate for causes and only took up the case against wind power once she heard about the project and started researching it.

“We are not activists,” she said. “I’ve never been involved in anything like this.”

Wednesday’s hearing was held in the council chambers at town hall in Simcoe in front of lawyers representing residents and the project.

The two-person panel hearing the case has the right to put a halt to the project. Last fall, construction was pushed back after a barn owl, an endangered species, was spotted next to the site.

The hearing also heard from Cayuga resident Grant Church, who cited a number of international studies that suggested wind turbines cause illnesses in people, even well beyond the 550 metre setback the Ontario government has set.

A tool and die maker by trade, Church said there are numerous examples of people being made sick by infrasound created by turbines, sometimes from as far away as 2.2 kilometres.

read more: Daniel R. Pearce, Simcoe Reformer Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Port Ryerse – A Funny thing happened on the way to the ERT

Credit:  photos courtesy of Larry Monczka

Port Ryerse, Ontario

Boralex Wind Project http://www.boralex.com/projects/portryerse

 A Funny thing happen this morning at the Environmental Tribunal Hearing. Biddle v. Ontario, 14-063 (Environmental Appeal)

It was another town and was supposed to be just another hearing against a wind  turbine project in southern Ontario.  The day was cool and the sun shone bright. The sky was clear blue and shimmered as the first blush of summer touched the landscape.  Port Ryerse  is a beautiful small village located on the shores of Lake Erie.  The peace and tranquility of  village life is threatened by a wind project that would see industrial wind turbines installed and not all of the people are welcoming the development.  It is land use that they have no planning veto over.   There are to be two appeals filed against the project.  The health and environmental hearings are planned to be held at separated  times and today’s hearing was the in person start to the health section of the legal wrangling.

Wednesday June 3, 2015 the task for the morning was a site visit.  All were to meet in the municipal Council Chambers of Norfolk in the town of Simcoe and start the  frantic speed style administrative steps, filings, counter motions and move on to what is now a predetermined outcome.   Wind takes and those who oppose lose.  This particular project has hit some speed bumps on its way as this is the wind project that has been halted by the presence of  a pair of rare nesting barn owls. The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry is now  scrambling to come up with a way  to be consistent and not to say no to this  particular renewable energy development.  It needs to create a new exemption that does not favour habitat or individuals from a species at risk.  Inconvenient for a wind developer and MNRF as that those darn those barn owls do exist and these birds are a nesting pair of less than 20 known adult individuals in the wild in Ontario.  The exemption  permit is necessary in order to side step species at risk legislation and to allow the wind project to proceed unimpeded.  Renewable energy is Ontario’s unflinching policy of the day.   That said on this day things didn’t go as it was supposed to.  On that day a funny thing happened at the Tribunal.  The citizens  didn’t play their expected roles.  That day as the hearing got under way it was a thumb down to Ontario and was about the residents taking back control of a process that guarantees they lose.   It was a small thing but it was the whisper of the people who have been shouting to be heard.

Early in the schedule of the day things went as expected as the Tribunal panel  members arrived and  lawyers began to gather for and against the project. After settling in, papers shuffled, microphones checked and the court reporter plugged in and  all was ready to proceed it was  becoming apparent something expected was missing.    Where were the people?

Not a single member of the public was present. Not a single witness present to hear the matters of the Tribunal.  Not a single member of the residents who had filed the appeal.  No one, not one person.  Lawyers, Tribunal panel members were confused and perplexed, even the appellant lawyer did not have knowledge or an explanation.  Despite the lack of an apparent audience things needed to get under way and a lack of members of the public must not slow down the process and the site visit was to occur.  Everyone headed out to the project site to meet up as prearranged for the tour.  This is the place where the barn owls live and the known nest of the local Bald Eagles is near. The Eagles had successfully fledged their eaglets in the previous season.

Unknown to all of the  lawyers  the people of Port Ryerse had other plans and had met each other on the shoulders of the dead end road that leads to where the turbines are supposed to be built.   Visiting and bird watching on such a beautiful day.  The people chose to speak by not sitting in a dry,  bland judicial process and used action as a protest to signal a way to bear witness to the invasion of their homes and community by unwanted industrial structures powered by the wind.  Today the voice of the people spoke well.

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Deliberate Harm to the Health of Rural Australians, via the RET, Enabled by the CER, via Parliament

OPEN LETTER

Dear Parliamentarian,

Tomorrow, the Bill to change the Renewable Energy Target (RET) will be debated in the Federal Parliament.

Consequences

If you vote for the Bill as currently proposed by Minister Hunt, you will be allowing continuation and expansion of serious harm to the health of Australian rural residents, from unmeasured and unregulated infrasound and low frequency noise (ILFN) from large industrial wind turbines.  This health harm includes turbine hosts, and results from ILFN from 600kW and larger turbines, extending out to at least 10km1

The two inevitable long-term consequences of the failure to measure and regulate ILFN are health damage to many more families, including children, with a risk of permanent health damage and lifelong sensitization to ILFN, regardless of the ILFN source which will restrict where some can work, live and sleep; and the creation of acoustically toxic homes that are valueless and uninhabitable, leading to the creation of rural ghettos.

Wind turbine noise is not the only source of industrial ILFN urgently requiring safer regulation – but the subject matter of this particular Bill will not result in harm to human health from industrial noise and vibration from coal and gas fired power stations, coal mines or CSG field compressors2.  These sources also cause similar serious harm to physical and mental health, well known to the Federal Department of Resources & Energy3. Continue reading Deliberate Harm to the Health of Rural Australians, via the RET, Enabled by the CER, via Parliament

Turbines or turtles: Hudak to natural resources minister

MPP says province should protect endangered species

Hamilton, june 25, 2009 -- The Blanding's turtle, (like this captive turtle named Bea,) that live in Burlington's Royal Botanical Gardens should benifit from  Minister of Natural Resources  announcement of $700,000 in grant money for species at risk stewardship projects. The RBG will use it's $60,000 in grant money to gather population data and restore six species including the Blanding's, (pictured) Northern Map and Eastern Spiny Softshell turtles. Glenn Lowson photo for The Toronto Star
Hamilton, june 25, 2009 — The Blanding’s turtle, (like this captive turtle named Bea,) that live in Burlington’s Royal Botanical Gardens should benifit from Minister of Natural Resources announcement of $700,000 in grant money for species at risk stewardship projects. The RBG will use it’s $60,000 in grant money to gather population data and restore six species including the Blanding’s, (pictured) Northern Map and Eastern Spiny Softshell turtles. Glenn Lowson photo for The Toronto Star

QUEEN’S PARK — Tim Hudak says the minister of natural resources must decide which is more important to Ontario: industrial wind turbines or endangered turtles.

Hudak called on MNR Minister Bill Mauro last week in legislature “to do the right thing” and protect Blanding’s turtles whose habitat is threatened by the onslaught of industrial wind turbines. The Blanding’s turtle is listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.

The most significant threat to this reptile are loss or fragmenting of habitat, motor vehicles, racoons and foxes. Another threat is poaching for the black market.

Hudak said a provincially-approved wind development in his riding puts the turtle at greater risk.

The 40 trucks loads of cement and 540 metres of steel required for each of the 77 wind turbines Niagara Region Wind Corp. has been approved to build puts the Blanding’s turtle in jeopardy. Twenty of the project’s turbines are slated to be built in known Blanding’s habitats.

Grimsby Lincoln News By Amanda Moore May 31 2015