Category Archives: Turbines & Property Devalue

Boiling Point Reached Over Testing Delays On Port Elgin Wind Turbine

Continued delays of acoustic testing of the Unifor wind turbine in Port Elgin has Saugeen Shores council sounding off.

Council is filing a complaint with Ontario Ombudsman Paul Dube regarding the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change’s promised testing of the turbine, which has not yet been completed.

Deputy Mayor Luke Charbonneau says the MOECC originally told council they would have the acoustic audit completed by June of this year, but adds it has been delayed at least three times since then, with the Ministry now saying the audit won’t be completed until at least next summer.

He says a sound testing company has been conducting preliminary data in the area of the turbine, which is located at Unifor’s Family Education Centre at the south end of Port Elgin, although that data has not been shared with either the MOECC or the municipality.

“We don’t know what the results of those tests have been, we have no audit, [MOECC] doesn’t know, so what’s going on?   It’s really simple to me, we need to know if this turbine is operating in compliance with the law,” says Charbonneau.

Charbonneau says the MOECC is blaming weather, a lack of wind and turbine down-time as the reasons for the testing delays.

Charbonneau’s home is one of more than 100 homes and cottages located within the 550-metre setback typically required for industrial wind turbines, though he says his family has not had any issues with the operation of the turbine, other than one complaint regarding shadow flicker, which was resolved.

Charbonneau says more than 50 complaints regarding the turbine’s operation have been received since February, most recently two weeks ago when a resident complained of the turbine making a thumping noise.

The 250-foot Unifor wind turbine was constructed by what was then the Canadian Auto Workers Union in 2012 and went into service a year later.

READ AT: http://blackburnnews.com/midwestern-ontario/midwestern-ontario-news/2016/10/13/boiling-point-reached-testing-delays-port-elgin-wind-turbine/

Random Niagara Wind- A Lousy Neighbour

What are they thinking?  Look at the following pictures of the guardrails being installed in West Lincoln for the Niagara Wind project to protect their hydro poles.  They are taken as if viewed while driving north from Smithville and show the random and lack of a consistent pattern in guardrail installation at various locations:

1

 

Some guardrails are many feet past the hydro poles and some are

even shorter…

 

 

Coming into the bend…

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In the middle of the bend…3

 

 

 

 

 

In front of the neighbour’s house…4

Coming out of the turn! Come winter this could be a real danger! People coming out of the turn could slam right into this mess…5

 

 

 

 

This picture is heading south …6

Final photo of today’s drive- The section of guardrail doesn’t even cover the  hydro pole!

(but it sure does”enhance” the value of the neighbour’s frontage)

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Wind projects make lousy neighbours.

Rural action plan calls for windfarm compensation for homeowners

Homeowners who think the price of their house would be hit by a nearby windfarm development should be able to claim compensation, the Scottish Conservatives have said.

The party will launch a comprehensive rural action plan on Monday at a major rural showcase in Stirling.

The strategy will cover a range of issues confronting rural Scotland, and was devised after the Scottish Government made clear its only focus was on land reform.

As part of the proposals, the Scottish Conservatives have called for a valuation system to be set up allowing people to recover the lost market value on homes affected by new windfarms.

Many communities across the country have complained that large turbines looming over their towns and villages have made the area less appealing to live, therefore reducing the price of their properties.

The party is asking the Scottish Government to look at a similar model in Denmark, where a valuation authority can decide if a person’s home has been impacted, and how much the windfarm developers should pay in compensation.

The SNP’s extreme pro-windfarm approach has sparked a rise in windfarms being built across rural Scotland, despite concerns among residents and local councils.

Scotland, despite having less than 10 per cent of the UK’s population, now hosts more than half of the UK’s windfarms.

Thousands of objections are submitted by the public every year, while local authorities receive scores of applications for developments each month.

read more: http://www.scottishconservatives.com/2015/02/rural-action-plan-calls-windfarm-compensation-homeowners/

This could happen to someone YOU know!!

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Sheffield: Therriens Moving Away From Wind Farm

The Therrien family on their Sheffield property.

122254-0The Therrien family, who live near the First Wind industrial wind development in Sheffield, are moving to Derby.

Steve and Luann Therrien are making arrangemets to relocate themselves and their children away from the six 400-foot wind towers within a few hundred yards of their 50-acre property off New Duck Pond Road in Sheffield.

First Wind, the corporation that built and operated the Sheffield development, changed hands last month. The new owners are SunEdison and TerraForm Power and nothing about the operation is expected to change. Continue reading This could happen to someone YOU know!!

MPAC and Wolfe Island, again.

INTRO

Several months ago Stewart Fast, a new professor at Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, undertook a study of why southern Ontario was such a hotbed of anti wind energy sentiments.  His conclusions were interesting, and I’ll be having more to say about them in a future posting.  As part of his study he looked at property values and in particular he looked at MPAC (the Ontario real estate assessors), Wolfe Island and the property assessment reductions thereon.

As it happens, I had also looked at MPAC and Wolfe Island and posted on it about 18 months ago.   It seems that Fast and I used the same FOIA-obtained spreadsheet.  My main conclusion was that there seemed to be a large number of large reductions on Wolfe Island, but there wasn’t enough of a pattern to convincingly tie the reductions to the 86 wind turbines on Wolfe’s west end.

I’ve also posted on MPAC and property assessments in a 4-part series.  My main conclusion, contained in part 1′s section, was that MPAC seemed to be hiding the reductions by lowering the values in neighborhoods that just coincidentally happened to be around wind turbines, but not formally incorporating distance to a wind turbine into their regressions.

What Dr. Fast’s work added to mine was that (1) he was able to group MPAC’s reductions on Wolfe Island by their distance to the nearest wind turbine, and (2) he reminded me of how to usechi-square to test the differences between the bands for statistical significance.  The quick summary is that MPAC has been providing reductions to properties close to wind turbines significantly more often that those further away.  And I’m not using the word “significantly” in some fuzzy qualitative manner – I mean “significantly” in the hard statistical quantitative manner.  In other words, the odds of the getting a wind-turbine-centered pattern just randomly are vanishingly small.  Wolfe Island provides a good hard-to-refute example of how MPAC is finessing the numbers to deny the obvious. Continue reading MPAC and Wolfe Island, again.