Category Archives: Environment

Infrasound Effects

Infrasound is found within our natural environment but it is the emissions generated by sources such as industrial wind turbines that are raising concerns.  There are growing reports of adverse health symptoms from residents whose homes are adjacent to electrical generation complexes powered by the wind.  The following letter points out negative health effects arising from exposure to man- made sources of infrasound were known and studied prior to current day rapid expansion of wind powered installations.

infrasound_orig
The Advertiser-Tribune| Letters to the Editor|December 1, 2018

Infrasound effects

I congratulate Seneca County for being selected to participate in one of the largest experiments to determine the effects of infrasound on human organ systems. With large numbers of massive wind turbines planned in this densely populated county, medical effects on internal organs can be analyzed.

The size of the proposed wind turbines ensures the generation of low-frequency infrasound. The proximity of wind turbines to schools guarantees that as children age, internal organ deterioration can be compared to child control groups from similar demographic locations lacking wind turbines. After 10, 20 and 30 years, researchers can evaluate effects on human internal organs from infrasound. This is important, because western scientific research and medical literature has little written concerning short, or long-term infrasound effects on human organs such as lung, heart and kidney.

However, infrasound effects on internal organ tissue have been studied by numerous researchers in the former Soviet Union. They found that infrasound waves cause significant changes to heart tissue and other internal organs.

In the 1990s, European investigators studied internal organs in animal subjects and human workers exposed to infrasound. They found significant changes in lung tissue and heart pericardium. The authors also were concerned with potential damage to internal kidney structures.

In January 2018, German researchers presented results concerning infrasound effect on cardiac tissue contractility. They found cardiac tissue exposed to infrasound decreased tissue contractility by 25 percent.

Seneca County wind farm companies state that wind farm sound levels will only approach 55dbA. That information is misleading concerning infrasound. The“A” designation is a filtration formula including only audible sound between 20Hz and 20,000Hz. Infrasound is defined as occurring between 0-20Hz and is not identified with the dbA formula.

With multitude turbines planned, decibel level determination may be problematic. Overlapping sound wave energies add together, similar to overlapping ripples on water from multiple stones dropped simultaneously. Some waves cancel out. Other waves enlarge. Wind turbine numbers become directly proportional to infrasound wave energy multiplication. Also, infrasound waves are stable, traveling great distances.

For those interested in their own personal research on infrasound effects, information was obtained for this letter from the PubMed website (Key words: infrasound AND heart, or infrasound AND physiological effects) and the Wikipedia website. Soviet research, translated from Cyrillic, was obtained from the archives at The National Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

Retired Capt. Michael T. Curran,

U.S. Navy,

New Riegel

Lake Erie Groups Rev Up Opposition

Cleveland.com| By Laura Johnston| April 15, 2019

WI070625_151.tif
Lake Erie Shoreline

Lake Erie groups rev up opposition to Cleveland wind turbine project, as developers negotiate with state

CLEVELAND, Ohio – The project has been on the horizon for a decade and a half: six wind turbines erected in Lake Erie, in the first freshwater wind project in North America.

But fervor over the issue is revving up now among boaters, as the developer, the nonprofit Lake Erie Energy Development Co., works through stipulations with the state.

The Lake Erie Marine Trades Association — made up of boat dealers, clubs and other enthusiasts — opposes the $126 million, 20.7-megawatt project dubbed Icebreaker, planned for 8 miles north of Cleveland. So does the nonprofit Lake Erie Foundation.

Both LEEDCo. and its opponents point to hundreds of pages of documents they say prove their points.

The fight is not so much over the six turbines up for state approval right now – but for the wind farm it could precipitate: thousands of spinning blades the Lake Erie Foundation fears will desecrate Lake Erie.

LEEDCo. CEO Lorry Wagner says there are “currently no plans” for more turbines. “You can have all the dreams and aspirations you want, but until you climb that first hill and see what’s out there, you better focus on that first hill.”

But Icebreaker is a pilot project, with a $40 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. LEEDCo. has partnered with Norway-based Fred Olsen Renewables, and its website says “we can build an industry and supply chain in Northeast Ohio that will creation 8,000 new good paying jobs and pump nearly $14 billion into our economy by 2030… as the industry grows here.”

An expansion would require more studies and more approvals.

Said foundation board member John Lipaj: “You cannot treat this as a six-turbine stand-alone project. We have to be realistic and treat it for what it is.”……

READ MORE HERE

No wind turbines on Great Lakes

wolfe island foggy
Wolfe Island Wind Turbines

Boating Industry|April 9, 2019

MBIA urges boaters to voice their opposition to wind turbines in the Great Lakes

The Michigan Boating Industries Association, along with environmental groups, boating associations, and property owners are urging boaters to raise their voice in opposition of the proposed Icebreaker wind power turbines in Lake Erie.

Nicki Polan, executive director of MBIA says: “MBIA is not opposed to alternative sources of energy. But, regarding wind farms in our Great Lakes, we find far too many unanswered questions and documented risks to the health and aesthetics of these unique and often times fragile bodies of water. We stand opposed to plans such as the one being considered in Ohio now and we encourage all boaters and boating businesses to join us in communicating this to Ohio.”

Michigan borders on four of the five Great Lakes including a large portion of Lake Erie. Many Michigan residents’ boat on Lake Erie, and many Michigan businesses and citizens live and work along its shores.

Only 2.5% of the world’s water is fresh water, and 20% of that is coming from the Great Lakes.

“Building wind turbines in Lake Erie will threaten clean water, boating access, one of the world’s best perch and walleye fisheries, bird migration, the safety and health of coastal residents, and so much more,” said Polan.

The initial goal of the Icebreaker plan is to place 6 wind turbines, with a final goal of 1,200 wind turbines in Lake Erie, costing an estimated $24 billion.

“Wind power has proved to be very high cost with low return,” said MBIA Board Member Jim Coburn of Coburn & Associated in Macomb, Mich. “Many wind turbine projects in the U.S. and overseas have been abandoned because of this. Why this is even being considered in our Great Lakes is beyond me.”

The case against turbines is extensive, including the fact that exploding and burning turbines can be commonplace. Each turbine contains over 400 gallons of industrial lubricants in their gearboxes.Gearbox seals are known to fail and will leak oil into the waters below. But when they burn there is no way to reach and extinguish them. As the 300-foot turbine blades burn, they create toxic emissions polluting the air and waters below.

Source: Boating Industry

White-Tailed Eagle Collision with Industrial Wind Turbine

A wind turbine located at northern Hokkaido, Japan with a high risk of bird strikes was monitored using a webcam surveillance system that was activated during the daytime every day from December 2013 to March 2014, which was the wintering season for the white-tailed sea eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla). A collision carcass of the white-tailed sea eagle was observed at the wind turbine on January 29, 2014 at 15:00. On analysis of the recorded data, we found that the moment of the collision was captured by both cameras.”

Turbine strike of White-tailed Eagle January 29, 2014
(Video 13 seconds length)

Unser Dorf hat Zukunft? Oder werden unsere Dörfer zerstört?/Our village has a future? Or are our villages destroyed?
(Video 4:59 minutes)

Charter Challenge Against Green Energy Act

The Green Energy Act is far from being repealed in Ontario.  The Charter Challenge led by CCSAGE continues on with the recent filing of a Notice of Application to proceed filed in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice.

Read Notice of Application here:

Source:
Notice of Application required to continue the Charter Challenge to the Green Energy Act by Alan Whiteley

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Avoidance=Habitat Loss

dead birds 3Wind industry in damage control over avian deaths and significant adverse environmental impacts of avoidance of essential ecosystems such as migration corridors.  Reading spin below it begs many questions least is how do dead raptors, birds and bats killed by wind turbines “learn”?

For a sobering reading of industry generated reports (self counted and self reported) of avian kills at wind facilities submitted to a voluntary data base please review:   Bird Study Canada

Freedom of information requests made by citizens in Ontario demonstrate industry reported kill rates are much worse: Bird-Bat-Mortality-SUMMARY

Journal for the Energy Transition|March 5, 2019|Benjamin Wehrmann

global flyways

Many migrating birds have learned to avoid potentially deadly wind turbines, but this behaviour equals a loss of habitat for the animals, researcher Ana Teresa Marques and others write in the Journal of Animal Ecology. “Soaring birds are among the most affected groups with alarming fatality rates by collision with wind turbines and an escalating occupation of their migratory corridors,” the researchers write. They equipped 130 migrating black kites with tracking devices to trace their travel routes at the migratory bottleneck of the Strait of Gibraltar between Spain and Morocco — an area that is crucial for many bird species and which is also used for wind power production — and found that the animals fly about 700 metres around the turbines, effectively reducing the area available for the birds to migrate by up to 14 percent. “Authorities should recognise this further impact of wind energy production and establish new regulations that protect soaring habitat,” the researchers write.

Wind power in Germany has seen increasing resistance in recent years not least due to its possible negative effects on wildlife. Germany’s Federal Agency for Nature Conservation (BfN) recently said that more attention had to be given to the impact of renewable power development on habitats and species. “An ecologically sound renewable roll-out is possible,” BfN president Beate Jessel said. Environmental NGO Nabu estimates about 100,000 birds in the country could be killed by rotor blades each year. To put this figure into perspective: Environmental organisation Friends of the Earth Germany (BUND) says that about 18 million birds in Germany die every year by crashing into windows.

Source: Journal for the Energy Transition

Griffon Vulture hit by wind turbine in Crete (Video Duration: 5 minutes 54 seconds)

Wind turbines cause functional habitat loss for migratory soaring birds

First published: 14 February 2019

Abstract

  1. Wind energy production has expanded to meet climate change mitigation goals, but negative impacts of wind turbines have been reported on wildlife. Soaring birds are among the most affected groups with alarming fatality rates by collision with wind turbines and an escalating occupation of their migratory corridors. These birds have been described as changing their flight trajectories to avoid wind turbines, but this behaviour may lead to functional habitat loss, as suitable soaring areas in the proximity of wind turbines will likely be underused.

  2. We modelled the displacement effect of wind turbines on black kites (Milvus migrans) tracked by GPS. We also evaluated the impact of this effect at the scale of the landscape by estimating how much suitable soaring area was lost to wind turbines.

  3. We used state‐of‐the‐art tracking devices to monitor the movements of 130 black kites in an area populated by wind turbines, at the migratory bottleneck of the Strait of Gibraltar. Landscape use by birds was mapped from GPS data using dynamic Brownian bridge movement models, and generalized additive mixed modelling was used to estimate the effect of wind turbine proximity on bird use while accounting for orographic and thermal uplift availability.

  4. We found that areas up to approximately 674 m away from the turbines were less used than expected given their uplift potential. Within that distance threshold, bird use decreased with the proximity to wind turbines. We estimated that the footprint of wind turbines affected 3%–14% of the areas suitable for soaring in our study area.

  5. We present evidence that the impacts of wind energy industry on soaring birds are greater than previously acknowledged. In addition to the commonly reported fatalities, the avoidance of turbines by soaring birds causes habitat losses in their movement corridors. Authorities should recognize this further impact of wind energy production and establish new regulations that protect soaring habitat. We also showed that soaring habitat for birds can be modelled at a fine scale using publicly available data. Such an approach can be used to plan low‐impact placement of turbines in new wind energy developments.

Experience of a Lifetime

You are invited to live the life of an experience you will always remember.

You are invited to bring your family, your grandchildren (young children) and your pets to spend an all expense paid week (bring your computers to enable you to continue to work) in the “green” area of industrial wind turbine business contracts.

Experience first hand shadow flicker, low frequency vibration, infrasound, children covering their ears because the noise hurts, computers that work but only when not impacted by turbine activity.  Sleeping in the basement is optional.

Enjoy the night sky.  Red blinking lights that penetrate your lodging, the backyard and the skies for tens of kilometres in the distance (because turbines are sooooo tall you can see them very very far) is one of the most unnatural scenes at night in rural Ontario.  As a preview please watch  the video to see the view from the USA over Lake Erie to Ontario.  The night sky daily looks like a runway, but it is the shoreline littered with turbines.  I hope you enjoy the view.

News 5 Cleveland published on Apr 19, 2017

Taste sediment-filled water which has been approved for consumption and usage.  Clean potable water can be purchased for a costly amount.

Experience what so many people in rural Ontario are forced to live with daily.

Experience what will happen to the people of North Stormont when you choose to approve the Nation Rise Wind project knowing the outcome.

Please note you will not be allowed to leave the premises to sleep in your vehicle should the vibrations become unbearable.

You are encouraged to purchase your lodging at a fire-sale price as property values in industrial wind turbine areas are greatly reduced.

We, the impacted people, hope you will enjoy your stay and the experience of what we live with daily.  We look forward to your offers of purchase.

Please advise me of dates available before June 1, 2019 and I will make your arrangements.

Following June 1, 2019 there will be a one year waiting period for the construction of the Nation Rise Wind project IF allowed to proceed.  Accommodations will be equitable to those presently offered.

Ruby Mekker
Ontario

Wind Turbine Fire in Nova Scotia

What happens to neighbours’ properties when they have toxic material strewn all over their fields?  When livestock graze on their shard-like pieces or walk on them?

CBC News|Wind turbine catches fire in West Pubnico|Mar.19.2019

Huge turbine threw burning hunks of material 100 metres to the ground

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A wind turbine in West Pubnico caught fire late Friday afternoon. (Frankie Crowell)

CBC News · Posted: Mar 16, 2019 10:08 AM

A wind turbine in West Pubnico caught fire late Friday afternoon. (Frankie Crowell)

A wind turbine caught fire in West Pubnico, N.S., late Friday afternoon, throwing huge, burning pieces of material to the ground.

Firefighters were called to the scene around 5 p.m., but West Pubnico fire department Chief Gordon Amiro said there was little firefighters could do to douse the flames.

“We couldn’t get nowhere near because the blades was still turning, so, and pieces was breaking off the blades,” he said. “So if a piece was to fall off, it would go a long ways with the wind and that. So it wasn’t safe to go nowhere near the tower at all.”

No one was injured.

Amiro said when the blades turn, the tips are more than 100 metres up in the air — too high to fight the fire from the ground.

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Firefighters say there was nothing they could do to put out the fire on the turbine because it was too high in the air for them to reach. (Frankie Crowell)

“There was nothing we could do more than watch what was falling down and if the ground was to catch fire, just to put it out on the ground.”

Firefighters say there was nothing they could do to put out the fire on the turbine because it was too high in the air for them to reach. (Frankie Crowell)

Amiro said two of the blades were completely burned and the nacelle, the gearbox at the centre of the blades that’s “almost as big as a school bus” was also seriously damaged.

Firefighters stayed at the scene for about an hour to ensure no one got too close.

Amiro said it’s a good thing it was raining and the ground was covered with snow.

“If that would have been August, we’d still be there trying to put wood fire out,” he said Saturday morning.

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Firefighters kept people away from the area during the fire due to falling pieces of burning material. (Frankie Crowell)

Firefighters kept people away from the area during the fire due to falling pieces of burning material. (Frankie Crowell)

Source: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/wind-turbine-fire-west-pubnico-1.5059425

FIRE SAFETY SCIENCE-PROCEEDINGS OF THE ELEVENTH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM pp. 983-995

COPYRIGHT © 2014 INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR FIRE SAFETY SCIENCE/ DOI: 10.3801/IAFSS.FSS.11-983984

“The fire problem in wind turbines arises as a result of large amounts of highly flammable materials (hydraulic oil and lubricants, composite materials, insulation, and polymers) contained within the nacelle of the wind turbine and packed in close proximity to potential ignition sources such as overheated mechanical components (hot surfaces) and electrical connections that could fail [8-12].

Once a fire is ignited in a wind turbine, the situation rapidly escalates because the high wind favoured by turbine locations enhances the supply of oxygen and, hence, the fire growth. In over 90% of wind turbine fires reported, a total loss of the wind turbine, or at least, a severe structural failure of the major components (blades, nacelle, mechanical or electrical components) has been reported[8].

Moreover, even in the case of rapid detection, the fire brigade cannot intervene because of the turbine height[9, 10, 12], and for offshore wind turbines it is impractical to send response teams to fight the fire[9]. Under high wind conditions, burning debris from the turbine may fall on nearby vegetation and start forest fires or cause serious damage to property (see Fig. 4)[10]

The nacelle can house a huge amount of flammable liquids including gearbox oil, transformer oil, hydraulics fluids and other lubricants. For example, in a single 1.5MW wind turbine, up to 900 litres of lubricating oil including cooling and cleaning fluids can be stored inside the nacelle”

https://www.iafss.org/publications/fss/11/983/view/fss_11-983.pdf

 

 

Pattern Energy’s Henvey Inlet Wind construction~Origin of fire in 2018

henvely inlet fire 1
Huge blaze engulfed 11 000 hectares in French River Provincial Park, July 2018. Fire investigation confirms origin point but clears Pattern Energy of Provincial offence.

Massive blaze sparked by off road construction for Henvey Wind that occurred in July 2018  linked to vehicle used for Pattern Energy project.

BREAKING NEWS: Ontario fire investigators clear wind developer Pattern Energy and workers on Henvey Inlet wind farm, after off road construction vehicle ignited 11,000 hecatare blaze that destroyed large chunk of French River provincial park last summer. @CBCNews @CBCSudbury pic.twitter.com/Hi7lKWQxsx

— dave seglins (@cbcdaveseglins) February 22, 2019

NEWS
Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry

Investigation into Parry Sound Wildland Fire Concludes

February 22, 2019 2:00 P.M.

The Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry has completed its extensive investigation into the Parry Sound 33 wildland fire.

The ministry’s team of investigators found that the fire originated at the location of a disabled vehicle in a remote area of Henvey Inlet.  Assistance was sought from a forensic fire expert.

While the investigation was able to determine the origin of the fire, no provincial offence under the Forest Fires Prevention Act was found to have been committed.

Source: News Ontario

Justine Lewkowicz Minister’s Office
Justine.lewkowicz@ontario.caMedia Desk Communications Services Branch
416-314-2106
Available Online

fire bullentin

Disponible en Français

Massive Ontario forest fire sparked by wind farm construction during extreme fire ban, workers allege|July 24, 2018| CBC News