Category Archives: Contracts Cancelled

Save Amherst Island

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APAI CALLS ON IESO TO CANCEL WINDLECTRIC’S FIT CONTRACT AND SAVE $500 MILLION – YES, $500 MILLION

APAI President Michèle Le Lay has called on Dr. Tim O’Neill, Chair, and Members of the Board of the Independent Electricity Operator of Ontario to cancel a contract with Windlectric Inc.(Algonquin) due to the inability of the company to achieve its Commercial Operation Date (COD) and comply with its contractual obligations.

In its 2016 Q2 Quarterly Report Algonquin advises that construction is expected to take 12 to 18 months and that the Commercial Operation Date (COD) will be in 2018. This timeline is contrary to what was submitted to the Environmental Review Tribunal and to the Ontario Energy Board. A COD of 2018 is seven years from the date of award of the contract.

Cancellation of the contract at this time would enable the IESO to achieve cost avoidance exceeding $500 million over the next 20 years based on the high cost of power generation at 13.5 cents per kilowatt-hour set out in the contract with Windlectric and based on the IESO’s commitment to pay Windlectric to not produce power when capacity exceeds demand. Cancellation of the Windlectric contract could be achieved without penalty due to noncompliance and would address in part the IESO’s budget challenges and energy poverty in Ontario.

Rick Conroy, in the “The End of Reason” from the Wellington Times, explains the Kafkaesque and cruel nature of allowing the Amherst island project to continue especially in light of the unused power capacity of the nearby Lennox Generating Station and the Napanee Gas Plant under construction.

In summary:

• Windlectric cannot comply with the Commercial Operation Date in its Fit Contract.

• At a time of skyrocketing hydro rates and financial challenges the IESO could save $500 million over the next 20 years by cancelling the Windlectric Contract without penalty.

• Existing nearby generating capacity is almost never used and will increase when the Napanee Gas Plant comes online. Intermittent and expensive power from wind turbines on Amherst Island is not necessary

The End of Reason
Rick Conroy The Wellington Times

wellingtontimes.ca

From Amherst Island, you can see the Lennox gas-fired generating station sitting idle most days. The plant sits just across the narrow channel. It burns both oil and gas to produce steam that, in turn, drives generators to create electricity. The plant has the capacity to generate 2,100 MW of electricity—enough to power more than a million homes. But that electricity is rarely ever used. Over the last decade, the Lennox station has operated at less than three per cent of its capacity. That means it is idle much more often than it runs. Yet it earns more than $7 million each month—whether it runs or doesn’t. Such is Ontario’s hyper-politicized energy regime.

Last Thursday was a warm day across Ontario— one of the warmest in a hot summer. With air conditioners humming, electricity demand across the province peaked at 22,312 MW. Meanwhile, Lennox sat idle all day. As it does most days.

So it seems odd that yet another gas-fired generating plant is emerging from the ground next to the mostly-idle Lennox station. It will add another 900 MW of generating capacity to a grid that clearly doesn’t need any more.

From Amherst Island, it must seem cruel. Within a couple of kilometres, there is enough unused power generating capacity to light millions of homes, yet island residents are being forced to give up their pastoral landscape— for the sake of an intermittent electricity source that nobody needs.

Last week, an Environmental Review Tribunal rejected an appeal by Amherst Island residents seeking to stop Windlectric, a wind energy developer, from covering their island home from end to end with industrial wind turbines, each one soaring 55 storeys into the sky.

Amherst Island is tiny. Just 20 kilometres long and 7 kilometres wide, there is no place, no horizon, no home that can avoid being transformed by this out-of-scale industrialization.

The treachery gets worse. Amherst Island is administered by a council that presides over the larger Loyalist Township from the mainland. Last year, council made a deal with the wind developer, agreeing to receive a $500,000 payment each year the wind turbines spin. It is a lot of money for a municipality that operates on a $12-million budget annually.

But perhaps the most disappointing bit of this story is the damage that has been done to friendships and families on Amherst Island. Just 450 people live here. It swells to about 600 in the summer. It was a close community in the way island life tends to be.

Industrial wind energy has, however, ripped this community in two. Property owners hoping to share in the windfall from the development are on one side and those who must endure the blight on the landscape for a generation or more on the other.

Lifelong friends no longer speak to each other. At St. Paul’s Presbyterian service on Sunday mornings, the wind energy benefactors sit on one side of the church, the opponents on the other. A hard, angry line silently divides this community.

The Environmental Review Tribunal concluded not enough evidence was presented in the hearings to say the project will cause serious and irreversible harm to endangered species including the bobolink, Blanding’s turtle and little brown bat.

The decision underlines the terrible and oppressive cruelty of the Green Energy Act—that the only appeal allowed for opponents is whether the project will cause serious harm to human health or serious and irreversible harm to plant life, animal life or the natural environment. It is a profoundly unjust restriction on the right of people to challenge the policies and decisions of their government as they directly impact their lives.

The folks on Amherst Island weren’t permitted, for example, to argue that the power is unneeded— that this project is a grotesquely wasteful use of provincial tax dollars. Their neighbourhood already boasts enough electricity capacity to power a small country, yet it sits idle—at a cost of millions of dollars each month. It might have been a useful addition to the debate—but this evidence wasn’t permitted.

Nor were island residents allowed to appeal the fundamental alteration of their landscape. Nor the loss of property value. They can’t undo the broken friendships and the hollow feeling that hangs over the church suppers or the lonely trips across the channel.

Wide swathes of reason and logic have been excluded in the consideration of renewable energy projects in Ontario.

To the extent that urban folks are even aware of what green energy policies are doing to places like Amherst Island, they console themselves by believing it is the cost of a clean energy future—that diminishing the lives of some rural communities is an acceptable trade-off for the warm feeling of doing better by the planet.

Yet these folks need to explain to Amherst Island residents how decimating their landscape, risking the survival of endangered species and filling the pockets of a developer with taxpayer dollars for an expensive power supply that nobody needs makes Ontario greener.

Visit Amherst Island. Soon.

Remember it as it is today. Mourn for its tomorrow.

Association to Protect Amherst Island:  http://www.protectamherstisland.com/

Blown over: Residents rejoice as wind turbine battle comes to a conclusion

By KATE DAY SAGER   Era Reporter  September 10, 2014 

ALLEGANY, N.Y. — Close to eight years of legal battles, community upsets and neighbors bickering with neighbors over a proposed 29-wind-turbine farm project in the town of Allegany came to an end on Tuesday.

The final nail in the coffin of the proposed EverPower Wind LLC farm in the communities of Chipmonk and Knapp Creek was hammered when the Allegany Town Board unanimously voted to rescind the wind overlay district.

“It’s been a long time coming and I’m glad this is over,” said Chipmonk resident Karen Mosman after the meeting. “But I’m in shock, is it real?”  Read rest of the article here.

NEWS RELEASE – ENERGY MINISTER CAN CANCEL WIND POWER CONTRACTS

From Wind Concerns Ontario

NEWS RELEASE

March 4, 2014 IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ENERGY MINISTER CAN CANCEL WIND POWER CONTRACTS

Despite statements made to the media by Ontario Energy Minister Bob Chiarelli that it would be “illegal” to cancel Feed In Tariff contracts with wind power developers, court documents show that the opposite is true, Wind Concerns Ontario states in a letter to the Minister today.

“The decision in Trillium vs. Ontario, 2013, clearly states that governments are free to alter policies in the public interest,” says Jane Wilson, WCO president. “As well, a legal opinion from Osler Hoskins Harcourt advises that companies in the renewable power business participate in government subsidy programs ‘at their own risk.’ That means, Mr. Chiarelli and his government could cancel these multi-million-dollar contracts if they want to.”

At present, Ontario has 55 wind power projects in various stages of approval; if all are approved the costs to Ontario could be more than $1 billion a year or $22 billion over the 20-year life of the contracts.

“Mr. Chiarelli said in the Legislature that Ontario has a surplus of power,” Wilson says. “The question for Ontario now is, why not cancel these contracts for power we don’t need and can’t afford? Does he answer to Ontarians, or the wind power lobby?”

CONTACT: Jane Wilson  1-855-517-0446 / 613-489-3591

A Human Species Habitat Witness Statement – Ben Lansink & Michael McCann

This is a Witness Statement done by professional real estate appraisers, who are experts in the human habitat of real estate. Effects of Turbines on those habitats are discussed.

Couple WIN Wind Turbine Ruling

This is a true Victory, as a court has upheld property rights violations! Next stop, Ontario

October 2, 2013  – The Connexion – France

A WINDFARM has been ordered to demolish ten turbines and pay compensation and fines after it was successfully sued by a couple.

Speaking to Le Figaro newspaper, the couple’s lawyer, Philippe Bodereau, said: “This decision is very important because it demonstrates to all those who put up with windfarms with a feeling of powerlessness that the battle is not in vain, even against big groups, or authorities who deliver building permits, that legal options are available to everyone, that we have a right to live in peace and that people can do other things than suffer.”

The couple bought their 18th century listed property, the Château de Flers, in 1993.

A tribunal in Montpellier ruled that the couple had suffered due to the “degradation of the environment, resulting from a rupture of a bucolic landscape and countryside”. It also agreed the couple had suffered from the noise of the turbines and from the flashing lights.

“The situation, instantly out of place, permanent and quickly unbearable, created a problem that went beyond the typical inconveniences of neighbours and constituted a violation of property rights,” ruled the judgement.

The value of the property had no bearing on the ruling.

The wind farm owners, Compagnie du Vent, have been given four months to take down the turbines, which were erected in 2007 on two sites next to the property in Nord-Pas-de-Calais. It has appealed the decision.

“Our projects are in the general interest, following the Grenelle de l’environnement and not in the interest of individuals,” said the president of Compagnie du Vent, Thierry Conil. “However, it’s right that democracy should allow people to take action.”

The two sites are a €20m investment and produce enough electricity for 22,000 people according to the company.

In 2010 it was ordered to demolish four turbines near Narbonne after it was taken to court by four farmers who were granted €430,000 in compensation. However after appealing it reached an out of court settlement.

Le Figaro said that lawyers associated with these cases said that they were often resolved amicably out of court. “I don’t know an example in France where a demolition was ordered and followed through,” one lawyer told the paper.

– See more at: //www.connexionfrance.com/wind-farm-turbines-demolition-noise-nuisanc

Windfarm subsidies will be axed, says Cameron

By Robert Merrick, September 29, 2013 – The Northern Echo – UK

Blindfold Green Energy PicSUBSIDIES for wind farms will be axed, David Cameron said – potentially scaling back development in County Durham, a wind power ‘hotspot’.

In an eve-of-conference interview, the prime minister revealed he did not want to keep the subsidies for “a second longer than they’re necessary”.

The move appeared to be in response to Ed Miliband’s eye-catching pledge to freeze energy bills for 20 months, from 2015, to tackle a “cost of living crisis”.

Critics claim the so-called ‘renewables obligation’ – which subsidises wind farms – piles £23 on each household bill.

But scrapping subsidies would be bitterly criticised by environmental campaigners, who argue the expansion of wind farms is crucial to cutting carbon emissions.

That includes in County Durham, which – on one calculation – has the second highest concentration of wind turbines in England, after Cornwall.

More than 20 farms have been built, or have permission, with another 13 in planning – and a controversial 24-turbine development earmarked for The Isles near Newton Aycliffe.

Speaking to the Sunday Telegraph, Mr Cameron said: “Recently, I opened the London Array, the biggest offshore wind farm anywhere in the world, and it’s good that Britain is leading the way in this technology.

E.ON recently agreed to reduce the output of The Isles wind farm from 63.5 megawatts (mw) to 48mw, which means it will be decided by local planners, rather than the Government.

Original Article Here: http://www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/news/10705835.Windfarm_subsidies_will_be_axed__says_Cameron/

Wind energy biggest loser as Abbott sweeps to power

By Giles Parkinson on 9 September 2013

It appears the reign of the eco-nuts has come to an end in Australia. We should be cautiously hopeful that the new Abbott government will bring an environment of sanity and common sense that seems to have been lost of late. I am so jealous. One day (soon) I hope they’ll be writing similar stories about us crazy canucks.

Clearly, the mood has turned. Three years ago Australians voted to save the planet, make love and then shoot the lights out. Now they want to axe the tax, trash the turbines, did up coal – and then go down with Palmer’s remake of the Titanic.

Entire article found here: http://reneweconomy.com.au/2013/wind-energy-biggest-loser-as-abbott-sweeps-to-power-15389

And on a more lighter note…..

http://www.news.com.au/travel/world/clive-palmer-says-staff-on-titanic-ii-will-recieve-more-than-a-pay-cheque/story-e6frfqai-1226637737349

Lack of Demand Closes Turbine Parts Manufacturer: Wausakee Composites, Cuba City’s largest private employer, closing : Wsj

July 26, 2013 5:15 am  •  

The largest private employer in Cuba City is closing its doors.

Wausaukee Composites, a parts manufacturer for the wind turbine industry, announced Thursday that it will close its more than 40,000-square-foot facility in the city’s industrial park.

The move, effective Friday, will eliminate 36 jobs from the city and comes after the company went into temporary shutdown mode on June 14 with an unknown call-back date.

“You never want to lose a plant, but the silver lining is we saw it coming and we were able to prepare for it,” said Taylor Gronau, economic development director for the city on the eastern edge of Grant County.

“I think Cuba City will fare well coming out of this. That building and site is incredibly useful. We think we can have this building sold within a year.”

In a letter to the state Department of Workforce Development, Edward Trueman, president and CEO of the company, said 33 employees will lose their jobs on Friday, while the remaining three employees have accepted positions at the company headquarters in Wausaukee, located in Marinette County.

“Wausaukee only recently learned that the primary customer served by the Cuba City facility was closing one of its facilities and would no longer be ordering component parts from Cuba City,” Trueman wrote.

He also cited federal tax law changes and decreased investment in the wind energy industry for a lack of new customers to replace the business recently lost.

The Cuba City employees, who are not represented by a union, do not have bumping rights at the company’s Wausaukee and Owosso, Mich., plants but are welcome to apply for any open positions, Trueman said.

Wausaukee Composites is a subsidiary of Sintex Industries, a multinational manufacturer and distributor of structural plastics and textiles.

Wausakee Composites, Cuba City’s largest private employer, closing : Wsj.

Coalition energy document focuses almost entirely on fossil fuels

Only reference to Australia’s $20bn renewable industry is repeat of promise to hold another investigation into the health impacts of wind farms – September 5, 2013 – Giles Parkinson – The Guardian

On wind, the energy document – in an apparent gesture towards the anti-wind members of its constituency – says: “Some members of public have serious concerns over the potential impacts of wind farms on the health of people living in their vicinity.

“The lack of reliable and demonstrably independent evidence on the subject of wind farms both adds to those concerns and allows vested interests on either side of the debate to promulgate questionable information to support their respective cases.

“We will implement a program to establish real-time monitoring of wind farm noise emissions to be made publicly available on the internet.”

The renewables industry has previously said that real-time monitoring would impose unbearable costs on the wind industry, and would be almost useless because of the inability to separate other noise in real-time.

Read entire article  here: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/05/coalition-energy-document-focuses-almost-entirely-on-fossil-fuels