Category Archives: Uncategorized

Wind Turbine Noise Conference 2019

Wanna go?  It should be an interesting discussion about the new World Health Organization Community Noise Guidelines  which passed comment about the impacts of noise from industrial wind turbines.    Dr. David Michaud lead researcher for the Health Canada Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study 2014 is to be a keynote speaker.

wind turbine noise conference

Wind Turbine Noise Conference|  Lisbon Portugal | June 12-14 2019

*NEW* WHO Environmental Noise Guidelines for the European Region

In 2018 the World Health Organization (WHO) released the Environmental Noise Guidelines for the European Regions including a conditional recommendation for wind turbine noise that is based on Lden. The Guideline Development Group only considered the wind turbine noise science base published up to 2015. There has been a rapid growth in research in the past 5 years so it is important to test the validity of the WHO recommendation against the totality of research published to date. David Michaud of Health Canada will be the principal speaker in a Forum chaired by Andy McKenzie of Hayes McKenzie and all attendees will have an opportunity to voice their opinions.

Source: Wind Turbine Noise Conference 2019

No wind turbines on Great Lakes

wolfe island foggy
Wolfe Island Wind Turbines

Boating Industry|April 9, 2019

MBIA urges boaters to voice their opposition to wind turbines in the Great Lakes

The Michigan Boating Industries Association, along with environmental groups, boating associations, and property owners are urging boaters to raise their voice in opposition of the proposed Icebreaker wind power turbines in Lake Erie.

Nicki Polan, executive director of MBIA says: “MBIA is not opposed to alternative sources of energy. But, regarding wind farms in our Great Lakes, we find far too many unanswered questions and documented risks to the health and aesthetics of these unique and often times fragile bodies of water. We stand opposed to plans such as the one being considered in Ohio now and we encourage all boaters and boating businesses to join us in communicating this to Ohio.”

Michigan borders on four of the five Great Lakes including a large portion of Lake Erie. Many Michigan residents’ boat on Lake Erie, and many Michigan businesses and citizens live and work along its shores.

Only 2.5% of the world’s water is fresh water, and 20% of that is coming from the Great Lakes.

“Building wind turbines in Lake Erie will threaten clean water, boating access, one of the world’s best perch and walleye fisheries, bird migration, the safety and health of coastal residents, and so much more,” said Polan.

The initial goal of the Icebreaker plan is to place 6 wind turbines, with a final goal of 1,200 wind turbines in Lake Erie, costing an estimated $24 billion.

“Wind power has proved to be very high cost with low return,” said MBIA Board Member Jim Coburn of Coburn & Associated in Macomb, Mich. “Many wind turbine projects in the U.S. and overseas have been abandoned because of this. Why this is even being considered in our Great Lakes is beyond me.”

The case against turbines is extensive, including the fact that exploding and burning turbines can be commonplace. Each turbine contains over 400 gallons of industrial lubricants in their gearboxes.Gearbox seals are known to fail and will leak oil into the waters below. But when they burn there is no way to reach and extinguish them. As the 300-foot turbine blades burn, they create toxic emissions polluting the air and waters below.

Source: Boating Industry

Pattern Energy’s Henvey Inlet Wind construction~Origin of fire in 2018

henvely inlet fire 1
Huge blaze engulfed 11 000 hectares in French River Provincial Park, July 2018. Fire investigation confirms origin point but clears Pattern Energy of Provincial offence.

Massive blaze sparked by off road construction for Henvey Wind that occurred in July 2018  linked to vehicle used for Pattern Energy project.

BREAKING NEWS: Ontario fire investigators clear wind developer Pattern Energy and workers on Henvey Inlet wind farm, after off road construction vehicle ignited 11,000 hecatare blaze that destroyed large chunk of French River provincial park last summer. @CBCNews @CBCSudbury pic.twitter.com/Hi7lKWQxsx

— dave seglins (@cbcdaveseglins) February 22, 2019

NEWS
Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry

Investigation into Parry Sound Wildland Fire Concludes

February 22, 2019 2:00 P.M.

The Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry has completed its extensive investigation into the Parry Sound 33 wildland fire.

The ministry’s team of investigators found that the fire originated at the location of a disabled vehicle in a remote area of Henvey Inlet.  Assistance was sought from a forensic fire expert.

While the investigation was able to determine the origin of the fire, no provincial offence under the Forest Fires Prevention Act was found to have been committed.

Source: News Ontario

Justine Lewkowicz Minister’s Office
Justine.lewkowicz@ontario.caMedia Desk Communications Services Branch
416-314-2106
Available Online

fire bullentin

Disponible en Français

Massive Ontario forest fire sparked by wind farm construction during extreme fire ban, workers allege|July 24, 2018| CBC News

Health Canada’s Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study- A Review

house and turbine 1

A new paper has just been published.  It is open access.

Krogh, C. M. , Dumbrille, A. , McMurtry, R. Y. , James, R. , Rand, R. W. , Nissenbaum, M. A. , Aramini, J. J. and Ambrose, S. E. (2018). Health Canada’s Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study—A Review Exploring Research Challenges, Methods, Limitations and Uncertainties of Some of the Findings. Open Access Library Journal, 5, e5046. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/oalib.1105046  

or  http://www.oalib.com/articles/5301313#.XBr6_PSno9M

Green Energy Act- Your Days Are Numbered

Tick Tock the Clock is running out on Ontario’s Green Energy Act

we will stop the turbines

“…We called the legislature back immediately after taking office, because we believed there were too many urgent priorities to wait until the fall.

Many of these priorities touch on the work you do.

It starts with these so-called green energy projects.

The previous government decided to ram these wind and solar farms into the backyards of communities that didn’t want them.

And then — to add insult to injury — they forced hydro ratepayers to hand over their hard-earned money and subsidize the insiders who got these contracts.

In fact, the Green Energy Act is the largest transfer of money from the poor and middle class to the rich in Ontario’s history.

And even during the election campaign, they were still doing this — right in the middle of the campaign — with the White Pines Project in Prince Edward County.

We’ve put an end to that. One of our first acts in government was to cancel 758 unnecessary renewable energy projects — and to cancel the White Pines Project.

Saving $790 million for ratepayers.

The Green Energy Act’s days are numbered.

And you can count on us to consult with you about your priorities….”

Premier Doug Ford’s remarks at the AMO 2018 Annual Conference

August 20, 2018 11:30 A.M.

Good morning, everyone.

Thank you so much for that kind introduction and the very warm welcome.

My friends, it’s great to be with you today.

And it’s great to be back in the beautiful city of Ottawa.

I want to start by recognizing all of the great work that AMO does in bringing municipal issues to the forefront of our government.

And I want to take a moment to thank my friend, the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing, Steve Clark, and his staff, for their work on behalf of our government with respect to this wonderful conference.

I am a huge believer in having an honest and open dialogue with municipalities.

I’m a former Toronto City Councillor myself.

So I know that our municipalities are often the level of government that is closest to the day-to-day lives of Ontarians.

The decisions you make around service delivery and infrastructure investments have real impacts on the daily lives of Ontario residents.

And you hear from the people of your communities every day — they let you know who you are accountable to, who we are all working for.

And this was certainly my experience at the municipal level.

Now, we all know the City of Toronto left AMO a couple of years before I was elected.

And while, of course, it’s up to Toronto and other AMO members to make their own decisions.

I do think, from where I’m standing now, I think it’s a missed opportunity for Toronto not to be participating in some capacity.

And there is one thing I know from my time on City Council, that I think everyone here can relate to.

It is if you don’t respect the taxpayers…

They will always remind you who you work for!

And that lesson holds true for me in my new job.

Because no matter what level we work at…

There is only one taxpayer.

Protecting taxpayers was a key theme in our most recent provincial campaign.

And for those of you in elected office, I am sure it will be a theme in your campaigns come the fall.

We all share in an obligation to respect taxpayers and deliver services efficiently and effectively.

And we must always — always — keep people first.

This commitment underpins everything our government does.

Quite simply — we’re for the people.

Last week the Ontario legislature rose.

We called the legislature back immediately after taking office, because we believed there were too many urgent priorities to wait until the fall.

Many of these priorities touch on the work you do.

It starts with these so-called green energy projects.

The previous government decided to ram these wind and solar farms into the backyards of communities that didn’t want them.

And then — to add insult to injury — they forced hydro ratepayers to hand over their hard-earned money and subsidize the insiders who got these contracts.

In fact, the Green Energy Act is the largest transfer of money from the poor and middle class to the rich in Ontario’s history.

And even during the election campaign, they were still doing this — right in the middle of the campaign — with the White Pines Project in Prince Edward County.

We’ve put an end to that. One of our first acts in government was to cancel 758 unnecessary renewable energy projects — and to cancel the White Pines Project.

Saving $790 million for ratepayers.

The Green Energy Act’s days are numbered.

And you can count on us to consult with you about your priorities.

We promised to tackle 21st-century crime and protect law-abiding families and citizens.

So we are giving our men and women in uniform the right tools and resources they need to keep families and communities safe from crime.

We are investing over $182 million in nine new Ontario Provincial Police detachments with the latest in modern policing technology.

So our police have what they need to go after the bad guys.

And when cannabis becomes legal in Canada, you can expect us to be ready. We will be ready with a system in place immediately that protects consumers, keeps our kids and communities safe, and undermines the illegal market.

Including $40 million over two years to help you prepare for legalized cannabis.

We will consult with you and — even more importantly — empower you to get this right.

We will be introducing legislation that, if passed, will give each of you the ultimate say in whether you want physical cannabis retail stores in your communities.

We also took action to make government in Toronto, York, Peel, Niagara and Muskoka more efficient with the Better Local Government Act.

And while you have the details about that Act, let me tell you that we are excited about what this law will do — saving taxpayers $25 million and improving decision-making across the city.

And the feedback we are getting from the people on this move has been overwhelmingly positive.

I occasionally get asked if I have plans to introduce a similar law here in Ottawa or elsewhere in the province.

I would say that many of Toronto’s issues are specific to Toronto, which is still governed by its own act.

And as for the other regional municipalities — what these four have in common is that the Liberals imposed these new elected regional chairs in 2016.

The last thing any municipality needs is yet another layer of elected politicians. That’s not how you make better decisions.

So these were unique situations. And no — we do not have plans for similar legislation in our future.

What we are doing is partnering with you.

As I’ve travelled across Ontario, I’ve spoken to countless mayors, councillors, wardens and other representatives.

And it doesn’t matter if I am in Kenora or Cornwall — I hear similar things time and time again.

You want a provincial partner that listens to your needs and the needs of your communities, instead of the insiders and the lobbyists.

A partner that helps you bring investment and good jobs to your communities.

A partner that cuts through the red tape and gets things done.

A government that puts up a big sign that says ‘Ontario is Open for Business.’

And we’ve already acted to create and protect jobs in Ontario.

We’ve protected the 7,000 jobs that depend on the Pickering Nuclear Generating station.

We’re also going to reduce the tax burden on businesses to attract investment and jobs across Ontario.

And we’re going to do whatever it takes to stand up for local Ontario jobs — no matter what happens in the trade dispute between the federal government and the United States.

For instance, we promised to get Ontario moving faster than ever before.

For cities like Ottawa, Kitchener-Waterloo, Hamilton, London, Brampton and Mississauga…

That means money to help them get major transit projects up and running.

For the rest of Ontario…

That means getting our highways and roadways back into shape for the millions of families, workers and businesses who use them every day.

And we’re going to make driving on those highways cheaper by reducing the price of gas by 10 cents per litre.

When I was sworn in as Premier, I said that this government would never forget who put us here: the people.

The people of this great province have trusted us to keep our word, and work tirelessly each and every day on their behalf.

For years, the people of Ontario have struggled under fiscal mismanagement, record levels of debt, and crumbling infrastructure.

What I learned as a City Councillor is that the big solutions to big problems often start with solving something small…

Like a phone call from someone in your community, asking for your help.

We’re going to continue to listen to the people.

We will work hard with you — because you are closest to the everyday needs of the people.

And together we will make this province better than it has ever been.

Thank you.

Read Here

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List of Cancelled Renewable Energy Contracts

Ontario windOntario releases list of cancelled renewable projects.

Contracts

The following lists are the projects identified for wind-down. The projects on these lists are Large Renewable Projects that have not achieved their Key Development Milestones, and Feed-In Tariff projects that have not received Notice To Proceed.

For further information, please contact the Independent Electricity System Operator at www.ieso.ca.

Complete list of cancelled projects:  Newsroom Ontario

New Government & Renewable Energy Contracts

 

NO DDOWT
Opposition to wind power generation facilities placed in rural communities played a role in the June 2018 election for Provincial Government

Ontario has elected a new Provincial Government and what lies ahead for the energy sector is sure to be an interesting play of policy decisions based on election promises and market realities.  Many opinions are being expressed as to what if will mean for contracts for renewable energy projects , including those powered by wind.

The link  below outlines an analysis of what may lay ahead.

What the new Doug Ford Government means for the Energy Sector – A detailed analysis, July 2018

PC Party Election Platform on Energy

Premier Doug Ford ran and won on a platform labeled For the People: A Plan for Ontario. The platform set out Ford’s energy plan, in its entirety, as follows:

We will:

  • Clean up the Hydro Mess and fire the board of Hydro One and its $6-million-dollar CEO. Our first act will be to end the Liberal practice of making millionaires from your hydro bills!
  • Stop sweetheart deals by scrapping the Green Energy Act.
  • Cut hydro rates by 12% for families, farmers, and small businesses by:
    • Returning Hydro One dividend payments to families.
    • Stopping the Liberal practice of burying the price tag for conservation programs in your hydro bills and instead pay for these programs out of general government revenue.
    • Cancel energy contracts that are in the pre-construction phase and re-negotiate other energy contracts.
    • Declare a moratorium on new energy contracts.
  • Eliminate enormous salaries at Ontario Power Generation and Hydro One.
  • Stabilize industrial hydro rates through a package of aggressive reforms.

What this will cost:

  • Hydro One Dividend – $300-$400 million per year.

  • Moving Conservation Programs to Tax Base – $433 million per year.

Wind Turbine Study being Conducted

Do you have an opinion on wind turbines? The Huron County Health Unit wants to hear it. Epidemiologist, Dr. Erica Clark, says they’re conducting a study to learn what factors may be affecting people who live close by.

Unifor_Wind_Turbine_in_Port_Elgin.jpg

Participation involves returning a completed consent form, doing the Registration Survey, and completing the Observation Diary. Recruitment ends on October 31st, and the data collection ends on December 1st.  

Source|June 28, 2018: Shoreline Today

To participate or more information: Contact-