Category Archives: Greenpeace propaganda

Blade construction uses pollutant implicated in water contamination

Wind power promises it is clean and green using the wind to generate electricity by spinning the blades of  wind turbines.   Focusing on the manufacturing process “clean and green” claims are tainted with growing issues surrounding the use of known pollutants used to make turbines.  Turbine blade production involves plastics and composite materials to create the finished product.   Like any industrial production the chemicals used can involve toxic water pollutants.  Pollutants which if released into the environment (and includes exposure risk to health for the people on the shop floor) that can be persistent. Risks and remedies are being studied by looking at known and unknown adverse effects.  Drinking water contamination concerns are heightened surrounding the types of plastics being used in the construction of industrial wind turbines.  Additionally it raises questions about risks of harm to the environment once the blades are exposed to the natural elements after installation.

“A highly toxic water pollutant, known as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), last year caused a number of U.S. communities to close their drinking water supplies. Because of its historical use in Teflon production and other industrial processes as well as its environmental persistence, PFOA contamination is a pervasive problem worldwide.”

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-06-pfoa-threat.html#jCp

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Wind Turbine Blades Mold Release Fabric- Teflon Peel Ply Fabric

The following is an example of PFOA containing products advertised for use in wind turbine blade manufacturing.

What is Wind Turbine Blade Mould Release Fabric?http://www.krteflon.com/list/?2_1.html

A Welland wind turbine blade plant received approval to discharge emissions into the environment from Ontario in 2014.  The list of allowed discharges reads like a chemical alphabet soup and clearly states that contaminates are surrounded by unknowns and no ministry standards.  Ironically this particular plant was closed shortly after citing a lack of new wind projects in Ontario.  READ about the plant closure.

Environmental Notice

“Emissions to the atmosphere include ammonia, petroleum distillates, ethylbenzene and suspended particulate matter.”

“Suspended particulate matter emissions occur from the sanding of the turbine blades and includes Bisphenol-A-(epichlorhydrin), formaldehyde, 1,6-bis(2,3-epoxypropoxy)hexane, Epoxy Resin, Phenolic Novolac Resin and Glycidated Alcohol. These contaminants do not have ministry POI standards. Ministry toxicologists have determined that, based on an assessment of available toxicological information and of guidelines from the MOE and other jurisdictions, the estimated maximum POI concentrations listed in this application for these contaminants are considered acceptable.”

power blade plant Welland
At the end of the day the blade production plant located in Welland, Ontario was closed after less than 2 years of production.
““Unfortunately, because of a lack of future projects we cannot continue”

 

 

 

Holding Greenpeace Accountable

greenpeace-logo-copyFossil fuel and insurance company executives “could face personal liability for funding climate denialism and opposing policies to fight climate change,” Greenpeace recently warned several corporations. In a letter co-signed by WWF International and the Center for International Environmental Law, the Rainbow Warriors ($155 million in 2013 global income) suggested that legal action might be possible.

Meanwhile, the WWF ($927 million in 2013 global income) filed a formal complaint against Peabody Energy for “misleading readers” in advertisements that say coal-based electricity can improve lives in developing countries. The ads are not “decent, honest and veracious,” as required by Belgian law, the World Wildlife ethicists sniffed. Other non-governmental organizations (NGOs) make similar demands.

These are novel tactics. But the entire exercise might be little more than a clever attempt to distract people from developments that could create problems for thus far unaccountable Big Green organizations.

I don’t mean Greenpeace International’s $5.2 million loss a couple weeks ago, when a rogue employee (since fired) used company cash to conduct unauthorized trades on global currency markets. Other recent events portend far rougher legal and political waters ahead for radical eco-imperialists, especially if countries and companies take a few more pages out of the Big Green playbook.

India’s Intelligence Bureau recently identified Greenpeace as “a threat to national economic security,” noting that these and other groups have been “spawning” and funding internal protest movements and campaigns that have delayed or blocked numerous mines, electricity projects and other infrastructure programs vitally needed to create jobs and lift people out of poverty and disease. The anti-development NGOs are costing India’s economy 2-3% in lost GDP every year, the Bureau estimates.

The Indian government has now banned direct foreign funding of local campaign groups by foreign NGOs like Greenpeace, the WWF and US-based Center for Media and Democracy. India and other nations could do much more. Simply holding these über-wealthy nonprofit environmentalist corporations to the same ethical standards they demand of for-profit corporations could be a fascinating start.

Greenpeace, WWF and other Big Green campaigners constantly demand environmental and climate justice for poor families. They insist that for-profit corporations be socially responsible, honest, transparent, accountable, and liable for damages and injustices that the NGOs allege the companies have committed, by supposedly altering Earth’s climate and weather, for example.

Meanwhile, more than 300 million Indians (equal to the US population) still have no access to electricity, or only sporadic access. 700 million Africans likewise have no or only occasional access. Worldwide, almost 2.5 billion people (nearly a third of our Earth’s population) still lack electricity or must rely on little solar panels on their huts, a single wind turbine in their village or terribly unreliable networks, to charge a cell phone and power a few light bulbs or a tiny refrigerator.

read more:   Climate Change Dispatch, Written by Paul Driessen, guest post on July 07, 2014.

Related article : Canada Leaves Greenpeace Red-Faced 11 Jul 1999