Category Archives: Energy Ripoff

Repealed or Not Repealed?

carrot.jpgToo good to be true?      The newly elected Ontario Government lead by Premier Ford has announced it is repealing the Green Energy Act  (GEA). At first flush this should be a good thing and cause for  tremendous celebration for wind warriors opposed to the harmful impacts of wind powered complexes especially for those families and individuals who have been raising alarms about adverse health impacts.  The GEA is the statute that has enabled renewable energy projects in Ontario to be built, operated and home for regulatory capture under prescribed regulations. But…. Is the announced Bill 34 an elaborate switch and bait hiding the powers of the  disastrous Green Energy Act in another statute?

Careful reading of the bill is generating the realization that moving the meat and potatoes of the GEA into  another law doesn’t remedy all what is wrong with renewable energy projects powered by wind.

You may want to comment on repealing the Green Energy Act: Deadline October 21, 2018

It is enough to have a mother take to drink.  Anyone got a buck for a beer?

“Ontario’s Green Energy Act was a horror for business, a gross invasion of municipal authority, and sent successive auditors general to whatever is the chartered accountants version of a hospice centre”

National Post article: Rex Murphy: The Green Energy Act is dead. Let that be a warning to green politicians

“…deprived Ontarians of natural justice, turning neighbour against neighbour as developers quietly signed deals to lease privately-owned lands in rural communities for massive wind turbines and solar farms, with the projects then sprung on those communities as a fait accompli, in which they had no meaningful say.”

Toronto Sun article: Goldstein:  Good Riddance to Toxic Green Energy Act

“Although the full effect of the legislation will be evident only when regulations become available, Bill 34 is another initiative in the government’s campaign to restrict further renewable energy development in Ontario”

Davies: Green Energy Act Repealed and Municipal Powers to Oppose Renewable Energy Reinstated

“All the partisans for and against the Green Energy Act (GEA) screaming about the act’s demise are missing the forest for the trees. Premier Ford’s new legislation claiming to repeal McGuinty’s signature legislative legacy preserves the core of the original GEA.”

Tom Adams: @FordNation’s Energy Policy Record So Far

“BILL 34 REPEAL GREEN ENERGY ACT OR IS IT??? Please share – people need to know…And let’s be honest and non-partisan about this…if the PCs are repealing the Green Energy Act why is there residue of the Green Energy Act being put into other legislation?”

Liz Marshall: Facebook September 24, 2018

 

News Release of Repeal of Green Energy Act, September 20, 2018

Read Bill 34:  Repeal of the Green Energy Act

Time for Change

“ONE LETTER issued to me in response to the two letters I had written to the Ministry of environment in Ontario, required immense resources in another attempt to shut me down.

A recent (partially released) FOI showed: TWENTY-ONE (21) employees at the ministry of environment and the attorney generals office were involved to create a single response to a resident of Ontario.

The email chain began in October of 2017 and I received a response March 1, 2018.

This is a brilliant example of the duplication and redundancy required when no one is responsible for anything and everyone just passes the buck or in this case the piece of paper.

Plausible deniability and not assuming responsibility has always been their game.

Tell Premier Ford to cut duplication, redundancy and administration.”

Contact Premier Ford:   HERE

Make your voice heard … they asked! Consultation: Review of Ontario government spending

vive a la resistance 2

Canada Pension Plan buys NextEra projects

nextera xNext Era has taken the money not once but thrice.  It used your money to help build the wind projects in Ontario,  it took your money for electricity generated and curtailed.  It sold the projects to the Federal Government and continues to generate income with service contracts for some of the projects.   You paid, are played and continue to pay.

About Cordelio Power

Headquartered in Toronto, Cordelio Power owns and manages a 396MW power generation portfolio, including four operating wind projects and two operating solar projects in Ontario. The company was launched in June 2018 to complete the purchase of this portfolio from NextEra Energy Partners. It is focused on working with all stakeholders to operate its projects in an efficient, safe and environmentally-responsible manner. Cordelio Power is owned by the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board.

Projects now owned by your pension plan:

money and turbines

Bluewater Wind Energy Centre | Conestogo Wind Energy Centre | Jericho Wind Energy Centre | Summerhaven Wind Energy Centre
Moore Solar Energy Centre | Sombra Solar Energy Centre

Source: Cordelio Power

 

 

Green Energy Act- Your Days Are Numbered

Tick Tock the Clock is running out on Ontario’s Green Energy Act

we will stop the turbines

“…We called the legislature back immediately after taking office, because we believed there were too many urgent priorities to wait until the fall.

Many of these priorities touch on the work you do.

It starts with these so-called green energy projects.

The previous government decided to ram these wind and solar farms into the backyards of communities that didn’t want them.

And then — to add insult to injury — they forced hydro ratepayers to hand over their hard-earned money and subsidize the insiders who got these contracts.

In fact, the Green Energy Act is the largest transfer of money from the poor and middle class to the rich in Ontario’s history.

And even during the election campaign, they were still doing this — right in the middle of the campaign — with the White Pines Project in Prince Edward County.

We’ve put an end to that. One of our first acts in government was to cancel 758 unnecessary renewable energy projects — and to cancel the White Pines Project.

Saving $790 million for ratepayers.

The Green Energy Act’s days are numbered.

And you can count on us to consult with you about your priorities….”

Premier Doug Ford’s remarks at the AMO 2018 Annual Conference

August 20, 2018 11:30 A.M.

Good morning, everyone.

Thank you so much for that kind introduction and the very warm welcome.

My friends, it’s great to be with you today.

And it’s great to be back in the beautiful city of Ottawa.

I want to start by recognizing all of the great work that AMO does in bringing municipal issues to the forefront of our government.

And I want to take a moment to thank my friend, the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing, Steve Clark, and his staff, for their work on behalf of our government with respect to this wonderful conference.

I am a huge believer in having an honest and open dialogue with municipalities.

I’m a former Toronto City Councillor myself.

So I know that our municipalities are often the level of government that is closest to the day-to-day lives of Ontarians.

The decisions you make around service delivery and infrastructure investments have real impacts on the daily lives of Ontario residents.

And you hear from the people of your communities every day — they let you know who you are accountable to, who we are all working for.

And this was certainly my experience at the municipal level.

Now, we all know the City of Toronto left AMO a couple of years before I was elected.

And while, of course, it’s up to Toronto and other AMO members to make their own decisions.

I do think, from where I’m standing now, I think it’s a missed opportunity for Toronto not to be participating in some capacity.

And there is one thing I know from my time on City Council, that I think everyone here can relate to.

It is if you don’t respect the taxpayers…

They will always remind you who you work for!

And that lesson holds true for me in my new job.

Because no matter what level we work at…

There is only one taxpayer.

Protecting taxpayers was a key theme in our most recent provincial campaign.

And for those of you in elected office, I am sure it will be a theme in your campaigns come the fall.

We all share in an obligation to respect taxpayers and deliver services efficiently and effectively.

And we must always — always — keep people first.

This commitment underpins everything our government does.

Quite simply — we’re for the people.

Last week the Ontario legislature rose.

We called the legislature back immediately after taking office, because we believed there were too many urgent priorities to wait until the fall.

Many of these priorities touch on the work you do.

It starts with these so-called green energy projects.

The previous government decided to ram these wind and solar farms into the backyards of communities that didn’t want them.

And then — to add insult to injury — they forced hydro ratepayers to hand over their hard-earned money and subsidize the insiders who got these contracts.

In fact, the Green Energy Act is the largest transfer of money from the poor and middle class to the rich in Ontario’s history.

And even during the election campaign, they were still doing this — right in the middle of the campaign — with the White Pines Project in Prince Edward County.

We’ve put an end to that. One of our first acts in government was to cancel 758 unnecessary renewable energy projects — and to cancel the White Pines Project.

Saving $790 million for ratepayers.

The Green Energy Act’s days are numbered.

And you can count on us to consult with you about your priorities.

We promised to tackle 21st-century crime and protect law-abiding families and citizens.

So we are giving our men and women in uniform the right tools and resources they need to keep families and communities safe from crime.

We are investing over $182 million in nine new Ontario Provincial Police detachments with the latest in modern policing technology.

So our police have what they need to go after the bad guys.

And when cannabis becomes legal in Canada, you can expect us to be ready. We will be ready with a system in place immediately that protects consumers, keeps our kids and communities safe, and undermines the illegal market.

Including $40 million over two years to help you prepare for legalized cannabis.

We will consult with you and — even more importantly — empower you to get this right.

We will be introducing legislation that, if passed, will give each of you the ultimate say in whether you want physical cannabis retail stores in your communities.

We also took action to make government in Toronto, York, Peel, Niagara and Muskoka more efficient with the Better Local Government Act.

And while you have the details about that Act, let me tell you that we are excited about what this law will do — saving taxpayers $25 million and improving decision-making across the city.

And the feedback we are getting from the people on this move has been overwhelmingly positive.

I occasionally get asked if I have plans to introduce a similar law here in Ottawa or elsewhere in the province.

I would say that many of Toronto’s issues are specific to Toronto, which is still governed by its own act.

And as for the other regional municipalities — what these four have in common is that the Liberals imposed these new elected regional chairs in 2016.

The last thing any municipality needs is yet another layer of elected politicians. That’s not how you make better decisions.

So these were unique situations. And no — we do not have plans for similar legislation in our future.

What we are doing is partnering with you.

As I’ve travelled across Ontario, I’ve spoken to countless mayors, councillors, wardens and other representatives.

And it doesn’t matter if I am in Kenora or Cornwall — I hear similar things time and time again.

You want a provincial partner that listens to your needs and the needs of your communities, instead of the insiders and the lobbyists.

A partner that helps you bring investment and good jobs to your communities.

A partner that cuts through the red tape and gets things done.

A government that puts up a big sign that says ‘Ontario is Open for Business.’

And we’ve already acted to create and protect jobs in Ontario.

We’ve protected the 7,000 jobs that depend on the Pickering Nuclear Generating station.

We’re also going to reduce the tax burden on businesses to attract investment and jobs across Ontario.

And we’re going to do whatever it takes to stand up for local Ontario jobs — no matter what happens in the trade dispute between the federal government and the United States.

For instance, we promised to get Ontario moving faster than ever before.

For cities like Ottawa, Kitchener-Waterloo, Hamilton, London, Brampton and Mississauga…

That means money to help them get major transit projects up and running.

For the rest of Ontario…

That means getting our highways and roadways back into shape for the millions of families, workers and businesses who use them every day.

And we’re going to make driving on those highways cheaper by reducing the price of gas by 10 cents per litre.

When I was sworn in as Premier, I said that this government would never forget who put us here: the people.

The people of this great province have trusted us to keep our word, and work tirelessly each and every day on their behalf.

For years, the people of Ontario have struggled under fiscal mismanagement, record levels of debt, and crumbling infrastructure.

What I learned as a City Councillor is that the big solutions to big problems often start with solving something small…

Like a phone call from someone in your community, asking for your help.

We’re going to continue to listen to the people.

We will work hard with you — because you are closest to the everyday needs of the people.

And together we will make this province better than it has ever been.

Thank you.

Read Here

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Green Energy’s Canadian Black Eye

wynne-hockey
Ontario’s Liberals lost official party status in the recent June 2018 vote for the provincial elections, under former Premier Wynne’s leadership.   Energy policies and rising electricity rates were a hot button election issue.

Struck by a Hockey Puck: Renewable Energy’s Big Canadian Black Eye

Renewable Energy World|June 8, 2018|By Chris McDermott

Everybody loves renewable energy, right? That’s what surveys tell us with global support for renewable energy consistently polling above 80 percent.

But don’t tell that to the people of the Province of Ontario, Canada. On June 7, the electorate handed a stunning defeat to its Liberal Government after 15 years of reign. The election winner: Conservative Doug Ford, brother of Toronto’s infamous crack-cocaine smoking mayor, Rob Ford. The issue in the forefront of voters’ minds: sky high electricity prices.

Ever since the Ontario Government invoked its Green Energy Act in 2009 to transition away from coal power to wind and solar energy, electricity prices have risen a whopping 75 percent. In Ontario, electric bills have become as frequent a topic of water-cooler conversation as apartment rents are in Manhattan or San Francisco.

Without question, on every measure of ratepayer protection Ontario is an egregious case of how not to design a renewable energy program:

Most Feed-in-Tariff (FIT) rates set not by competitive bidding but instead by Government decree at levels as high as $C 80.2 cents ($US 62 cents) per kWh for 20 years
No mechanism to automatically adjust FIT rates downward as capacity deployment thresholds were reached
Domestic Content requirements that raised domestic equipment prices above global average selling prices
A rule that ratepayers still provide FIT payments for energy even when energy production is curtailed
An allowance of five years after FIT contract execution for facility construction, creating windfall gains for developers as equipment costs declined while preventing ratepayers from participating in any of those savings.
How did Ontario get their renewables policy so wrong?

READ REST of ARTICLE

The Green Energy Act is Toast

“The Green Energy Act is toast,” he added. “But the act is a very large, far-reaching piece legislation. It’s not just about some wind and solar generation. It has huge impacts on the administration of the electricity system.”

Tom Adams-Energy Analyst & Researcher.

ford
Doug Ford is to be Ontario’s new Premier  

London Free Press|June 9, 2018|Randy Richmond

Post-election analysis: Five key local issues to watch

From deeply divisive wind energy projects, to school closings and transportation, five issues loomed large in the London region during the Ontario election.

GREEN ENERGY: ‘The pigs are not going to fly’

Randy Richmond

The London Free Press

Despite Doug Ford’s commitment to tear apart Ontario’s energy system, consumers shouldn’t expect to see much change in their electricity bills, says an energy analyst and researcher.

“Don’t expect your rates to go down. The overall cost of power is likely to rise over the next four years. The power system will look a lot like it does today,” Tom Adams said.

What will likely be gone: The Liberals’ $600-million conservation fund that paid homeowners for installing energy efficiency upgrades.

But even that won’t come without strong opposition, said Adams, author of several academic papers on energy and a consultant for consumer organizations.

Ford has promised to scrap the controversial Green Energy Act, the legislation that led to costly wind turbine projects across Southwestern Ontario – often over the objection of municipalities stripped of control over the location of energy projects.

The legislation became the flashpoint for anger over rising energy bills, which were caused only in part by sweetheart contracts with green energy suppliers.

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Next Era selling Ontario Wind & Solar

Beyond words…..

DSCN1859
Wind Turbines Summerhaven project- Haldimand County

NextEra selling Ontario wind & solar assets

NextEra Energy Partners, LP announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement with Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPPIB) for the sale of its portfolio of wind and solar generation assets in Ontario, Canada, for a total consideration of about $582.3 million. This includes the net present value of the O&M origination fee, subject to customary working capital and other adjustments, plus the assumption by the purchaser of approximately $689 million USD in existing debt.

Wind turbines
The transaction includes the sale of six fully contracted wind and solar assets with an average contract life of about 16 years.

“We are pleased to reach this agreement with CPPIB for the sale of our Canadian portfolio, which we expect will be accretive to NextEra Energy Partners’ long-term growth,” said Jim Robo, chairman and chief executive officer. “The sale of these assets, at a very attractive 10-year average CAFD yield of 6.6%, including the present value of the O&M origination fee, highlights the underlying strength of the partnership’s renewable portfolio.”

An affiliate of NextEra Energy Resources will continue to operate all of the facilities included in the transaction under a 10-year services agreement with CPPIB.

As discussed during our earnings call in January, we expect the sale of the Canadian portfolio to enable us to recycle capital back into U.S. assets, which benefit from a longer federal income tax shield and a lower effective corporate tax rate, allowing NextEra Energy Partners to retain more CAFD in the future for every $1 invested. We expect to accretively redeploy the proceeds from this transaction to acquire higher-yielding U.S. assets from either third parties or NextEra Energy Resources,” added Robo.

The transaction includes the sale of six fully contracted wind and solar assets, with an average contract life of approximately 16 years and 10-year average CAFD of $38.4 million. Located in Ontario, the portfolio has a combined total generating capacity of approximately 396 MW and consists of:
◾Bluewater, a 59.9-MW wind generating facility;
◾Conestogo, a 22.9-MW wind generating facility;
◾Jericho, a 149-MW wind generating facility;
◾Summerhaven, a 124.4-MW wind generating facility;
◾Moore, a 20-MW solar energy generating facility; and
◾Sombra, a 20-MW solar energy generating facility.

NextEra Energy Partners expects the sale to close during the second quarter of 2018. The transaction is subject to receipt of regulatory approvals and satisfaction of customary closing conditions.

NextEra Energy Partners continues to expect a Dec. 31, 2018, run rate for adjusted EBITDA of $1.00 billion to $1.15 billionand CAFD of $360 million to $400 million, reflecting calendar year 2019 expectations for the forecasted portfolio at year-end 2018.

Citi and CIBC Capital Markets are serving as financial advisors to NextEra Energy, and McCarthy Tétrault LLP and Gowling WLG (Canada) LLP are legal counsel.

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